Posts tagged 'Zero lower bound'

Are the BoJ’s negative rates a con?

Some guesswork from Jefferies on Wednesday:

The upcoming 27-28 April BoJ meeting is likely to push the authorities into finally admitting a plan to consolidate the JGB holdings into perpetual bonds alongside a formal move away from inflation targeting to nominal GDP targeting. There is a growing realization that there are effective limits to how much more JGBs can be acquired…

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Bank profits, negative rates and evidence

You take your data points where you can get them and for negative rates that means, mostly, here:

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On the absurdity of today’s safe haven flows

From the FT’s Jamie Chisholm on Thursday:

Gold and the yen are surging to multimonth highs while stocks and the dollar are in sharp retreat after Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen warned that global financial market turbulence could hurt US growth.

Yes indeed. But it’s also an entirely absurd and inefficient market reaction.

If you tell people you’re going to tax them just for the privilege of having them lend you their spare capital, those people are in turn supposed to treat you like an ungrateful entity and walk away to find more grateful recipients elsewhere or — at the very least — spend the tax differential on people or causes who might in the end benefit from the spending and show you some non-monetary gratitude even if they’re unlikely to ever pay the sum back directly. Read more

Negativity all the way down

Not sure how many more pixels you’ll tolerate us spilling on the BoJ’s move negative, but this from Simon Derrick at Bank of New York Mellon seems worth your time. With our emphasis, and pars broken up for online readability:

Whether or not the BOJ’s decision was a direct reaction to the ECB’s decision to potentially push even further into negative territory doesn’t really matter. Indeed, it doesn’t even really matter whether or not the BOJ was trying to weaken the JPY by their move (in our opinion plausible deniability remains a key tool for central bankers).

What does matter is that four of the eight members of G8 (France, Germany, Italy and Japan) now have an official negative deposit rate while Canada continues to suffer the impact of collapsing oil prices (Russia, which has had its membership suspended, suffers from the same issue of course).

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Er, what lower bound? And $5.5tn worth of negative nuts

ICYMI, and on the back of the BoJ going negative, “the universe of DM government bonds trading with a negative yield rose to a record high of $5.5tr, or 24% of the JPM Global Government Bond Index,” according to JPM.

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How much yen can you fit in a cubic metre?

If the BoJ and Mr Kuroda are thinking about storage costs – after taking interest rates to minus 0.1 per cent and saying they “will cut the interest rate further into negative territory if judged necessary” — this might be useful.

From Oxford Econ’s Gabriel Stein & Ben May:

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Buiter on the death of cash

We’ve spilt a fair few pixels on the potential limits of negative rates and proposals to get around the pesky zero lower bound. Citi’s Buiter has weighed in on this for some time and has done so again on Thursday.

To wit:

We present three practical ways to eliminate the ELB: i) abolish currency, ii) tax currency or iii) remove the fixed exchange rate between zero-interest cash currency and central bank reserves/deposits denominated in a virtual currency.

There’s more in the usual place for those who want it but, for now we thought we might just pull out his list of disadvantages to getting rid of cash Read more

Breaking through the ZLB with virtual currencies

Here’s a crazy thought to start the New Year year with. What if virtual currencies were born less of an organic anti-government peoples’ movement and more of extreme unconventional monetary policy by the state? The ultimate central bank Jedi mind trick if you will, which takes easing to levels that conventional policy just cannot go.

But even if it’s not a plan hatched directly by monetary bodies to serve the interests of the state, there’s still a strong argument to be made that virtual currencies could be doing the Fed, the BoE and even the ECB a big favour. Read more

Gold, paper, scissors, lizard, e-money

Miles Kimball, economics professor at the University of Michigan who blogs at Confessions of a Supply-Side Liberal, is fast becoming the poster child for the movement to introduce an e-money solution to overcome the ZLB problem.

He’s not the first to have raised or promoted the idea, but he’s doing a very fine job at spreading the word on account of his objective reasoning. Read more