Posts tagged 'Tapering'

Nobody could have predicted…

At the end of 2013, the CFA Institute surveyed its members on a range of topics, including the asset classes they thought would do best in 2014. The year isn’t over, but we thought it would be fun to update you on the status of those predictions.

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Losing his Raghuram

Turkey-like policy action is hypothetical, I would not venture there.

- Raghuram Rajan, RBI governor, Jan 29th. We’re assuming he meant he wouldn’t touch the hypothetical…

Anyway, this is how Citi’s David Lubin explains the rupee’s recent fortitude already battered position and, perhaps, Rajan’s aggresive attitude to the Fed’s tapering: Read more

Inflated worries, part 1 — an overview of US inflation pressures

Here’s a rough sketch of the variables influencing US inflation, which has been remarkably low for two years running:

1) The remaining labour market slack, including a staggering and resilient long-term unemployment problem. The amount of slack remains tough to know given the difficulty of measuring the cyclical vs secular components of the fall in the labour force participation rate. Much more on this later.

2) The output gap. This isn’t a well-defined idea, we know, but few people would argue that the US economy is producing at potential. The US economic recovery does appear to have accelerated in the final two quarters of last year (the December jobs report notwithstanding), and the conditions for growth look better than they have in years. If the nascent acceleration proves sustainable, then the labour market may well tighten up and push wages higher. Obviously this is related to the first point about labour market slack, and plenty of caveats are needed given the head-fakes of the last four winters. Read more

Past performance is no guarantee

With thanks to the eagle eyed Tracy Alloway, the year in asset class returns illustrated in shades of Deutsche Bank blue.

(Spoiler: not such a good year for gold, commodities, or A-Rod baseball cards). Read more

Deflation and secular stagnation: the real threats to EM

This guest post is from Larry Brainard, Chief Economist and Co-Founder of Trusted Sources, an independent advisory firm specialising in emerging market macroeconomic and policy research.

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The continuing debate about the timing of Fed tapering has overshadowed two developing issues that have important implications for EMs in 2014. The first is the reappearance of deflation in the Eurozone and the other is the suggestion by former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers that the US economy is slipping into secular stagnation. Read more

“Tapering is off the table”

Fresh from having made $1bn impeccably timing the putative US recovery in the first half of this year (and Japan, natch), Andrew Law of Caxton Associates – one of the world’s most successful macro traders – has now turned bearish, and in quite a big way.

Caxton, a hedge fund named after the printer (its now-retired founder Bruce Kovner is a billionaire bibliophile), believes the Fed will keep running its presses:

We have been expecting the US economy to reach escape velocity led by housing and corporate capital expenditure… but for whatever reason that just hasn’t happened…tapering is off the table for the foreseeable future.

Caxton is long across the US yield curve (the debt debacle has been a good buying opportunity, if nothing else). Mr Law has spoken extensively with us about his view on the global economy and the state of the hedge fund industry. Tree-based publishing issues mean those thoughts came in truncated form. Below are some extended excerpts from him. Read more

The ECB’s very own tapering problem

A while ago we speculated that because of the ongoing bifurcation of the eurozone market, Eonia rates could rise, and liquidity once again concentrate in core economies, as banks pay back their LTRO funds.

Even if it appeared that the system could handle the repayments, banks in core economies would still be inclined to take advantage of extremely cheap negative rates available in collateral markets, so as to earn a spread on the deposit facility in a way that arguably encumbered the remaining liquidity. That would make it less available to periphery institutions.

Meanwhile, without the additional layer of ECB liquidity in the system — which acts as a type of system-wide insurance mechanism — periphery banks would consequently be forced to make ever more competitive bids for Eonia funds, lifting rates across the board. Read more

Here’s something that wasn’t prepared earlier

Our glass house location duly noted. But still, one immediate casualty of Fed non-action has been investment banking prose.

From M&G’s Bond Vigilantes… Read more

Rajan, onions, and the Fed

*Use interesting onion stat to highlight Indian inflation problem ahead of Rajan’s first rate decision where the expectation is for a hold, but language and liquidity steps are in the spotlight*

*Attempt weak onion+tears metaphor*

*Delete because too weak/awful* Read more

Carney confusion du jour

Barclays asks clients what they think every few months and the latest batch of answers from 799 dart throwing interns global investors show that they are ready, set and already yawning over the prospects for tapering by the Fed this week.

In the UK, however, who knows? Consensus came there none. Read more

We cannae give the economy no more, we’re giv’n it all we’ve got Captain

The working theme at FT Alphaville towers is that we’re in somewhat of a damned if we do taper/suspend QE, and damned if we keep going with it.

There is, as we’ve long been noting, good reason to suspect the economy cannot handle any more quantitative easing in its traditional form.

What’s more, we now know that even the whiff of tapering — which is anything but an unwind, as we’ve noted here – can cause undue chaos in risk assets. In which case, perhaps tapering isn’t as much of an option as many believe it to be.

After all, QE reflects the sovereign put. It’s the government subsidy which takes volatility away. If you stop dishing it out, there’s every chance bad things may happen.

And the following chart, which comes to us by way of Aurelija Augulyte, reflects this relationship perfectly: Read more