Posts tagged 'Russia'

Guest post: What if Putin had bought Crimea?

The prospect of selling any sovereign territory to resolve disputes may seem like a taboo — especially so when it comes to the conflicted territory of Crimea. However, Joseph Blocher and Mitu Gulati, both law professors at Duke University, argue that such a “market” should in future be considered in public international law.

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Bank flowchart + geopolitics = acid trip

At least Nomura acknowledge the absurdity… anyway, all Ukrainian roads lead to political uncertainty.

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Crimeanomics favours the West

This guest post on the Ukraine crisis is from Jorge Mariscal and Alejo Czerwonko, emerging markets chief investment officer and emerging markets economist, respectively, at UBS Wealth Management.

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Super Novatek

The Russian market has turned wary of “synergies” at Novatek.

From the Wall Street Journal last year: Read more

Putin in the Micex

Russian stocks having a bad morning following the sanction filled night before:

 

That’s the Micex off 3 per cent and the RTS off 3.7 per cent at pixel… Read more

If this tit-for-tatting escalates…

That’s banks’ exposure to Russia by major economy, put together using BIS data by Gilles Moec and team at Deutsche. Click the image to enlarge. Read more

“TIMCHENKO, Gennady… Geneva, Switzerland” (UPDATED)

There’s a familiar name on the latest Specially Designated Nationals List in the US sanctions against Russia…

TIMCHENKO, Gennady (a.k.a. TIMCHENKO, Gennadiy Nikolayevich; a.k.a. TIMCHENKO, Gennady Nikolayevich; a.k.a. TIMTCHENKO, Guennadi), Geneva, Switzerland; DOB 09 Nov 1952; POB Leninakan, Armenia; alt. POB Gyumri, Armenia; nationality Finland; alt. nationality Russia; alt. nationality Armenia (individual) [UKRAINE2]… Read more

Guest post: Ukraine’s debt — now comes the interesting bit

When your creditor takes some of your territory — can you make that territory take some of your debt? Mitu Gulati, a law professor at Duke University, last wrote for us on Russia’s $3bn Ukrainian bond. With Russia reinforcing its annexation of Crimea, Mitu considers Ukraine’s options with its debt after the secession.

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In Putin’s Russia, risk prices you

Or, why investors might be less than sanguine about sanctions against Russia.

We could start with the OFZs.

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Guest post: Mr Putin’s clever bond issue

What to do when your creditor invades? Beyond its occupation of Crimea, Russia remains a lender to Ukraine — even as IMF teams ponder the Kiev government’s financial sustainability. Mitu Gulati, a law professor at Duke University, considers both sovereigns’ options.

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EM’s dark debt squeeze exposure

If you take the blue pill, the story ends. You wake up in your bed and believe exactly what the statistics tell you to believe. You take the red pill — you stay in Wonderland and I show you what the statistics just can’t see.

What we’re talking about is hidden debt. The debt that’s out there but which we can’t currently see or assess. That is, dark debt which as yet hasn’t been factored in or priced into asset prices that influence our financially abstracted version of reality.

We have of course been here before. During the subprime crisis unexpected sums of dark debt emerged from off-balance sheet bank liabilities, SIVs and such the like. The impact, as we all now know, was immense.

But there’s a very good reason to suspect that “dark debt” hasn’t gone away entirely. It may, as it turns out, still be lurking out there somewhere. Still skewing our perception of reality as it always did. Read more

IAMA G8 leader contemplating invasion. Ask me anything.

Vladimir Putin’s gave his first official address on the Ukraine crisis on Tuesday.

Among the key points made (via Reuters, and emphasis on our favourite snap):

RUSSIA’S PUTIN SAYS USE OF FORCE IN UKRAINE IS A CHOICE OF LAST RESORT

PUTIN SAYS RUSSIA RESERVES RIGHT TO USE ALL OPTIONS IF THERE IS LAWLESSNESS IN EASTERN UKRAINE

RUSSIA’S PUTIN SAYS THOSE CONSIDERING SANCTIONS SHOULD THINK OF THE DAMAGE THEY MAY INCUR

RUSSIA’S PUTIN SAYS ALL THREATS AGAINST RUSSIA ARE “COUNTERPRODUCTIVE AND HARMFUL”

PUTIN SAYS RUSSIA READY TO HOST G8, BUT IF WESTERN LEADERS DON’T WANT TO COME “THEY DON’T NEED TO”

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Dead catski bounce?

Micex edition:

Depends on how confident you are that the market and economists can predict Putin’s next move, we suppose. Read more

The economic consequences of geopolitics

Clear enough where Russian assets are concerned at least… the CBR has gone to war just hiked by 1.5 percentage points to put a stop to the rouble’s tumble.

From Reuters:

The central bank did not mention Ukraine in its statement, but said the decision to raise rates was aimed at preventing “risks to inflation and financial stability associated with the recently increased level of volatility in the financial markets”…

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Ukraine $1,984,838,000 5.00 per cent Notes due 2015 — and the burning tyres therein

Moscow doesn’t send tanks into revolting former vassals any more. It sends dollars.

For anyone who decides to follow the money when it comes to Ukraine’s split between the EU and Russia, the consequences can sometimes be grimly surreal when it gets to the prosaic matters of bond finance. Read more

Russia must use Olympics to shrug off contagion talk

On the eve of the Sochi opening ceremony, FT Alphaville is pleased to present this guest post by Jorge Mariscal, emerging markets chief investment officer at UBS Wealth Management…

As it hosts this month’s Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia will spend more time entertaining the world than educating it about the Russian economy. But financial market conditions mean it must also use the Games as a platform to prove some serious economic points.

This year, a tidal wave of capital outflows has engulfed emerging market currencies. Although Russia is stronger than the average developing nation, its currency and stock market have underperformed emerging market averages, with declines of 7.3 per cent and 11.6 per cent in US dollar terms, respectively. Against this backdrop, Russia needs to use the Games as a platform to advertise its resilience and competitiveness to investors. Otherwise, contagion from weaker countries risks sweeping it up. Read more

EM: the kevlar-gloved take

We’re coming to the end of a… multidirectional week for EM rates and currencies. BNP Paribas’ strategist here also pokes the media in the eye for “vying to produce the most bearish story on emerging markets…”

(Who, us?)

So we should note this dose of bullishness from the French bank: Read more

Magnitsky, the libel courts, and sanctions

On 16 November 2009 Sergei Magnitsky died in prison in Russia. Shortly before his arrest and imprisonment he had been investigating a substantial tax fraud committed against the Russian Federation by a criminal gang. I shall refer to this tax fraud as the Hermitage Fund fraud.

Beyond this short summary, many of the facts in issue between the parties are unknown or controversial, and are subject to stark divisions of opinion…

So began Mr Justice Simon’s judgment in Pavel Karpov v William Felix Browder & Hermitage Capital Management Limited & others on Monday. And the rest is very much worth reading. Read more

An Olympic peek into Russia

Russia has plenty of places with snow. But when it come to picking a spot to host the Winter Olympics, they chose here — Sochi — one of Russia’s warmest cities.

It’s a Friday. In August. Why not sit back and let the FT’s Charles Clover entertain you with this highly amusing and informative glance into preparations for the 2014 Winter Olympics, and Russia’s psyche. After all, the boss is probably on a beach somewhere and not all of one’s attention is needed to man the fort, right?* Read more

Russia’s LTRO (or LTROski, if you insist)

This is something we should have already picked up on. Russia’s central bank has its own LTRO going on and it had its first auction on Monday. Twas a little disappointing.

First, a catchup from Nomura: Read more

Cyprus – just pop the red pill, please

Kinda strange that markets should get all a-jitter just as the Cyprus crisis is moving towards a resolution.

Simon Derrick of BNY Mellon asked on Friday: “The red pill or the blue pill.” The answer — choose reality — seems pretty obvious, but let’s first run through Derrick’s handy re-cap…

What’s the problem?

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A Cypriot game of chicken

After that resounding no vote, what’s in the stars for Cyprus today?

Martina Stevis and Michalis Persianis write in the WSJ that there are short term ideas — basically, Cypriot and European officials are discussing capital controls for when banks are due to open next Tuesday.

Meanwhile the IMF is coming up with a plan to merge Cyprus’ two biggest banks into a ‘bad bank’, a source told the pair. The IMF wouldn’t be drawn on that.

Where does the ECB stand in all this? Read more

More on the Russian angle

The hunt for an accurate Russian exposure figure to Cyprus continues.

Here’s Danske Bank’s Vladimir Miklashevsky with the best estimate we’ve seen yet (our emphasis): Read more

The Russian angle

Paul Krugman thinks the Cyprus bailout is all about the Russians.

As he noted in his New York Times blog:

You can sort of see why they’re doing this: Cyprus is a money haven, especially for the assets of Russian beeznessmen; this means that it has a hugely oversized banking sector (think Iceland) and that a haircut-free bailout would be seen as a bailout, not just of Cyprus, but of Russians of, let’s say, uncertain probity and moral character. (I think it’s interesting that Mohamed El-Erian manages to write about this thing, fairly reasonably, without so much as mentioning the Russian thing.)

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The Russia liquidity house

Quick. Someone grab a samovar! Russian liquidity it is on-tap.

In fact, Russia’s recent liquidity operations have been so substantial, they almost make Chinese efforts look puny in comparison. Read more

Russia: oil price down, capitalism up?

So Russia is getting its wallet out again. This is from the FT on Monday:

Russia is setting aside up to $40bn for this year and next to shore up the economy in case the crisis in the eurozone escalates and spreads, and is dusting off a plan that would allow the government to recapitalise the country’s banking system. Read more

Why Saudi Arabia wants to bathe the world in affordable oil

Thursday’s Opec meeting is expected to be a cracker. Supply is relatively abundant right now, but Saudi Arabia wants the quota raised. Iran, Venezuela, and a bunch of other Opec members fearful for their export receipts definitely do not want that.

The FT’s Guy Chazan writes that it’s expected to be a tussle that Saudi and its Gulf state allies will lose, despite their considerable power within the cartel. The point, some industry watchers maintain, is just to send a message that Saudi’s got this: that is, it won’t let high oil prices worsen the risk of a global slowdown. A message it probably sees as very necessary as the Iranian sanction deadline draws nearer, and the world economy looks more fragile. Read more

Fiscal credibility vs democracy

Last November John Hempton wrote an amusing post arguing that Ben Bernanke’s problem was that the Fed’s credibility was too high, thus creating a liquidity trap, and to solve this Bernanke should do something crazy like appear on television wearing a Hawaiian shirt and smoking a spliff.

John Kay’s latest FT column looks at the problem of credibility, although more in a fiscal than a monetary context. As he points out, we frequently hear now that credibility is the problem besetting heavily-indebted governments. Credibility is seen as a kind of panacea but Kay points out it’s only a very recent concept in economics: not in Keynes, not in Smith, not in Marshall. It dates back to a 1979 article by Finn Kydland and Edward Prescott, he says, who won a Nobel economics award for their work on the subject. Read more

From more Russians, with longer life expectancy

In this quad of graphs, can you spot the odd one out?

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RTS: falling faster than Putin’s tears

On a pretty gloomy Tuesday morning generally, Russia’s headline RTS index is taking a particularly severe beating.

Be it protests, the threat of a ratings downgrade (Fitch got nervous yesterday) or otherwise, something has spooked investors and Monday’s gains have been well and truly reversed. Whatever post-election-Putin-stability-bounce existed has disappeared. Read more