Posts tagged 'Robots'

Insurers will destroy themselves to nudge us into robot utopia

How to tell that serious investors are yet to take the Morgan Stanley robot car wonderland seriously? Insurance companies still have value.

The point is this: where we’re going we’ll still need roads, but there won’t be (much) call for car insurance.

Moreover, insurers are going to be the agents of their own demise. They have no choice, the logic of robots is just too compelling, and the process has already begun. Read more

Robots won’t make you rich (for long)

We commented yesterday on a column by Martin Wolf that considers how the economy will change as robots become ever more intelligent. The rise of the machines will indeed present society with multifaceted challenges; super-rich robot owners, however, are unlikely to represent one of them.

The fear of exploding inequality from robots is widespread. Wolf writes: Read more

Crowdsurfing the finnovation wave

FT Alphaville tasted the future of financial innovation this week, or at least the parts of it pitching for business at the Finnovate conference in London’s Billingsgate market.

It had the buzzy feel of a corporate hospitality tent at a music festival — ties off, iPads out, lets do business in close proximity to what the kids are up to. In this case though the stage was given over to seven minute presentations for aps, websites and, er, innovation platforms. Read more

Squish puny humans, investment theme du jour

Bank of America Merrill Lynch strategist Michael Hartnet favours themes this year.

Theme number one: it doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop.

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Technology vs globalisation as cause of the declining labour share

Hat tips to Noah Smith and James Hamilton for highlighting two papers on the possible causes behind the declining share of income that has flowed to labour in recent decades, and especially since the turn of the century:

Chart via Hamilton. Read more

Puny human analysts to be crushed by algorithmic steamroller

What’s the value of a good idea these days?

We ask because Institutional Investor has dedicated several pages to considering the imminent death of human insight in finance, as the machines squish take over. (H/T to Climateer.)

In this bold future, even your spell checker will be offering stock tips: Read more

History of the robot future’s future history, part 2: DeLong on Malthus-Mill-Keynes

Last week, after excerpting a passage by Robert C Allen that dated the start of the Industrial Revolution to 1760, I floated a question about the history of economic thought:

If you had asked economists in 1759 whether such a fundamental shift was ever likely to happen, would they have thought the possibility ludicrous? Would they have argued that in the 12,000 years since the dawn of agriculture, humanity had yet to escape the Malthusian Trap — and therefore why believe that such an escape was even possible? Read more

The history of the robot future’s future history

The graph represents three decades of US middle class employment shrinking as a share of the employed labour force, with the occupations along the graph’s X-axis proceeding left to right from the least- to the highest-paid. The top four occupations and three of the bottom four have increased their share of employment, at the relative expense of the middle three.

It comes via this Third Way paper by Frank Levy of MIT and Richard Murnane of Harvard, which includes an extended section regarding the trends (emphasis ours): Read more

Time to take basic income seriously?

Paul Krugman is getting serious about the effects of technology and robots on the economy. He’s made noises about this theme before, but this time he’s taking things a bit further by offering a potential solution to the more sour consequences of the new industrial revolution.

If the fight is between capital and labour, and capital is winning, it seems subsidies in the form of some basic type of income may be called upon. Read more

Bernanke weighs in on robot wars; brings Keynes for backup

Many factors affect the development of the economy, notably among them a nation’s economic and political institutions, but over long periods probably the most important factor is the pace of scientific and technological progress.

That’s Ben Bernanke addressing a graduating class at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, Massachusetts, on Saturday. He goes on to say that not everyone believes this advancement is going to continue at such a great pace.

Yes, he is talking about Robert Gordon and Tyler Cowen, and their arguments that much of the low-hanging fruit has been plucked and we face a lower-growth future, as evidenced by the incremental advancements of recent years. Read more

Do markets dream of electric androids?

ROBOTS! AUTOMATONS! CYBORGS! ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE! ARGHH!!!

Last weekend I attended Robots on Tour, a robotics, humanoids and cyborg exhibition put together by the Zurich-based Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the University of Zurich. Read more

Skidelsky on robots and more leisure

Love him or loathe him, Robert Skidelsky’s prose always makes for a good read.

His latest offering comes by way of Project Syndicate and relates to the issue of robots and the rise of automation. To what degree are we really approaching a leisure society and how best to respond to the changes afoot? Read more

Robots, employment and sector safety

Above is a chart from CreditSights of employment changes by sector since the start of the last recession. Education and health jobs account for roughly 15 per cent of the working labour force, and their number has grown by nearly 11 per cent. Only mining has posted a higher growth rate (17 per cent), but obviously off a much smaller base. Read more

The FT Alphaville podcast, with Dylan Grice

Welcome to FT Alphaville’s extraordinarily infrequent podcast… (click through for the podcast link).

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The robot economy and the new rentier class

It seems more top-tier economists are coming around to the idea that robots and technology could be having a greater influence on the economy (and this crisis in particular) than previously appreciated. Paul Krugman being the latest.

But first a quick backgrounder on the debate so far (as tracked by us). Read more

Happy Black Monday Friday to you!

Here’s a tip — if you’re naming a memorable event, try not to put the day of the week in it. It’s awkward when it comes to anniversaries. Let us nonetheless take a moment to pause and reflect, with Deutsche Bank’s Jim Reid:

25 years ago today the financial world went into paralysis as Black Monday struck stock markets around the globe. For context the DOW dropped 22.61% that day (the biggest % down day in history) or 508 points to 1738.74. I wish I’d have invested my paper-round money in the market at the close. Instead I was saving up for a new shiny Walkman

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China flash PMIs — the employment factor

The latest HSBC/Markit Economics flash PMI for China paints a slightly odd picture.

Okay, so overall it’s positive – the index is 49.5 for July compared to 48.2 in June. The best number in five months, although it’s also the ninth month of below-trend growth. Read more

Redefining labour

This is the third installment in FT Alphaville’s “Beyond Scarcity” series, a somewhat radical look at the impact of technological progress and efficiency on the volume of goods and services being produced by the system, asking whether “abundance” could now be a key determinant of deflationary forces in the western world.

On top of this, we have considered the role played by “artificial scarcity”, whether imposed wittingly or unwittingly by industry participants as a counterweight to such deflation, and to what degree such measures could now be running into scalability issues. In short, whether there is a limit to how much artificial scarcity private organisations can impose to counteract deflationary forces of abundance, without experiencing diminishing returns. Read more

For the bots: Anne Hathaway is NOT Warren Buffett

You hardcore financial types might have missed the below FT story, given it was in the Film & Television section of Friday’s paper and concerned a Hollywood starlet.

But wait! It’s financially relevant. We promise: Read more

A Dutch machine with a fat finger

A possible culprit has been found for Wednesday’s sharp movement in cable — which saw the GBP/USD exchange rate drop to 1.5181 and recover in the space of a few minutes. A(nother) tradebot. To be specific, says FT Alphaville, some market participants are blaming an algorithm gone wild at a Dutch bank. Read more

CSI: Chicago

The Chicago Mercantile Exchange has published its account of what happened on May 6, the day of the Flash Crash, FT Alphaville writes. And yes, it does read a bit like the script to a Crime Scene Investigation episode — busting trades and all that.  Read more