Posts tagged 'Negative Interest Rates'

Quantified negativity and the ECB

Just in case Draghi actually, finally, opts for negative rates later today and puts us all out of our misery, Deutsche Bank’s George Saravelos has taken a stab at how big a hit the euro would take (with our emphasis in the last paragraph): Read more

The path towards definancialisation, or not?

Or, why it’s nuts out there

In this series we have thus far presented the economic argument for the introduction of “free money”, whether it be via the rise of private market virtual units or central-bank dropped bundles of helicopter money.

The question which arises, however, is what does it mean when anyone in an economy can self-create money and have it respected without the need for national guarantees? The answer, presumably, is that there is such a shortage of money relative to output that the system flourishes with every virtual unit that’s created by the system — i.e. there is more risk in hoarding output than in distributing it.

And more specifically, that there’s a greater benefit in creating money “no strings attached” than with conditionality attached to it in the form of bank credit money. Read more

Competitive devaluation through currency fragmentation

We promised at the end of our previous post that we would qualify the economic case for the introduction of “free money” with some direct references to Willem Buiter, Citi chief economist and former BoE MPC member.

So here follow some of his observations on all things “money” during a liquidity trap, as plucked from his papers on seigniorage, the nature of irredeemable fiat money, numerairology and the use of virtual currencies to break through the ZLB from the last decade or so. Read more

When QE becomes decentralised

In a previous post we presented research by Willem Buiter, Citi chief economist and former BoE MPC member, which he conducted in the mid 2000s, into whether virtual currencies could be a useful mechanism for breaking through the zero-lower bound.

The idea in many ways represents an evolved form of QE, in which differentiable units from dollars are pumped into the economy, inducing an effective negative interest rate on dollars due to the fact that there is less of the new currency in circulation than the established one. Seen from this light, the recent rise of private virtual currencies could can be seen as amounting to the market’s own endogenous version of QE. Read more

Breaking through the ZLB with virtual currencies

Here’s a crazy thought to start the New Year year with. What if virtual currencies were born less of an organic anti-government peoples’ movement and more of extreme unconventional monetary policy by the state? The ultimate central bank Jedi mind trick if you will, which takes easing to levels that conventional policy just cannot go.

But even if it’s not a plan hatched directly by monetary bodies to serve the interests of the state, there’s still a strong argument to be made that virtual currencies could be doing the Fed, the BoE and even the ECB a big favour. Read more

Can we just hurry up and go negative already?

Yup, we’re back here again. Here’s how Credit Suisse ranks the ECB’s options if, or when, the increasingly dovish governing council decides that more easing is necessary:

The first option comprises exhausting the ECB’s standard policy lever by cutting rates further. We expect this to be the first response if more needs to be done and could be prompted by inflation falling to 0.5% y/y or lower. A further cut in the key policy rate would also entail taking the deposit rate into negative territory.

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Draghi on the edge of deflation

The Credit Suisse European economics team are growing concerned about Mario Draghi’s disinflation problem:

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The ECB, negative rate confusion and the prepay tax option

The ECB meets this week and expectations about what Draghi and team may or may not do seem to be erring towards the non-event side of things.

But, as Beat Siegenthaler at UBS observed in a note on Monday, there still seems to be a lot of confusion about the likelihood and usefulness of negative rates being introduced. A rise in eurozone rates over the past two weeks has only added to the confusion: Read more

Swiss negativity, free lunches and the IMF

Everyone has an open mind about negative rates these days… Swiss National Bank chief Thomas Jordan has said he certainly does following this piece of repeat advice from the International Monetary Fund’s annual report on Switzerland (our emphasis):

The conjuncture of Switzerland may render some of the potential drawbacks [of negative interest rate] less relevant than in other countries. Activity in the interbank market is already very low, as all banks have excess liquidity. Switzerland is experiencing strong credit growth, particularly in the mortgage market. The impact of negative interest rates on mortgage rates depends on the pass-through.

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What the Danish negative rate experience tells us

Back in July, 2012 the Danish central bank, Nationalbanken, lowered the deposit rate to -0.2 per cent. Back then we wrote that it was going to be costly for the banks, and that money market rates were going deeper into negative territory. With Draghi’s comments last week, how did that whole negative deposit rate action turn out for Denmark?

Nordea had a note out last week on that very subject. Now, before we move, let’s remember that Danish monetary policy is tailored around the FX peg. The deposit rate was there to assure outflow because of mounting pressure on the EUR/DKK pair. Read more

If you can’t beat them, just spend

Gary Jenkins writing in Credit Matters this week gets to the heart of the matter when it comes to what investors should do with their money (our emphasis):

Is nowhere safe? The natural reaction to this is that fi nancing for banks should become more expensive. We are already seeing this reaction in the market to some degree. But what does this mean for a product like Cocos? How does an investor monitor the risk of conversion if the ECB could, on any given day, decide to withdraw liquidity unless the bank were to improve its capital position?

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On negative interest rates and hoarding

Okay. Negative interest rates have now gone fully mainstream in the UK thanks to this week’s testimony by Bank of England deputy governor Paul Tucker.

Even the Daily Mail is writing about it.

But a number of major misunderstandings are popping up as a result. So let us try to clear some of them up. Read more

Tucker goes Jedi (ish)

Throwing around the negative interest rates idea has become very trendy all of a sudden with Draghi, Praet and Constancio weighing in and, we’d argue, using the threat to substitute for policy impotence.

So, was Bank of England deputy governor Paul Tucker doing the same thing on Tuesday morning in front of a Parliamentary committee? Using a jedi-trick to talk down sterling perchance? It’s not a phrase you use lightly and it seems unlikely he would have whacked it out completely unintended. But it has to be said, if he was going Jedi here, the effect didn’t last all that long. Read more

On SWFs being paid to borrow

The big story on Friday concerns the terms and structure of Qatar’s life-saving support for Barclays at the peak of the financial crisis in 2008. As Daniel Schäfer, Caroline Binham and Simeon Kerr report, the key issue is whether Barclays lent Qatar the money to buy shares in the bank. Read more

This normalising world

From the Danish central bank:

Effective from 25 January 2013, Danmarks Nationalbank’s interest rate on certificates of deposit and the lending rate are increased by 0.10 percentage point. The discount rate and the current account rate are unchanged. Read more

Commodity volatility, where art thou?

Remember the whipsawing days of 2008? The days when commodity prices couldn’t get crazier?

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Why negative interest rates are a bad idea, by Capital Economics

Dear central bank of Santa,

We, the banks, think we have been really good this year. We didn’t pick on retail customers. We didn’t tell on our Libor manipulating friends. We respected our regulator parents. And most importantly we didn’t have a hissy fit that nearly brought down the global monetary system. Read more

The muddled consequences of negativity

Some Praet-prattle in the WSJ last week has put a bit of a dampener on the idea that the ECB is gonna go for a negative deposit rate in the near term. Read more

Credit Suisse finds positives in negative (rates) [updated]

Are you a Swiss bank? Do you have haven appeal? Want to make some quick, easy money? Then keep reading…

Credit Suisse has decided it will start charging negative rates on Swiss franc cash balances above a certain threshold. From CS: Read more

Human sacrifice, the original negative interest rate

The abstract from the latest paper by Peter T. Leeson entitled “Human Sacrifice” (H/T Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution): Read more

Some Danish negativity consequences

Remember when Denmark’s central bank went negative, back in July?

After the ECB’s deposit rate went to zero, the Nationalbanken cut its own deposit rate, largely in order to stem capital inflows. Read more

How to kill a bank, Denmark edition

To all those still defending negative interest rates — arguing that the stimulative effects will outweigh the costs to banks — we bring you the following from Tina Mortensen at Citi on Wednesday:

Denmark — FSA urges banks to charge customers more and to cut costs deeper to stay competitive. Following the introduction of negative interest rates, Danish banks are struggling to maintain their interest rate margins. At the same time, the economy has still not recovered from last year’s funding crisis and the fallout of a burst housing bubble in 2007. Read more

The yield negativity is spreading…

Here’s an interesting factoid by way of Bartosz Pawlowski from BNP Paribas’ CEEMEA team — Eurozone yields aren’t the only ones being haunted by negativity.

As it turns out, euro-denominated non-eurozone debt is also treading perilously close to the zero mark. Read more

We told you negative rates were a big deal

Okay. It’s true. We’ve become slightly obsessed with negative yields at FT Alphaville. Especially with regards to what they signify for the financial industry.

Though, for a long time we’ve felt very much alone with this obsession. Weirdly enough, nobody else has seemed too bothered about it. (Note, we even had to go to the ECB directly to ask Draghi what he thought about it.) Read more

Confused curve signals

A while ago we observed that negative gold leasing rates were potentially signalling something awry with the Libor rate.

That judging by gold forwards, the Libor component of the gold lease rate calculation  (Libor-GOFO = Lending rate) was coming in much lower than what might otherwise be expected. Read more

The ‘natural experiment’ of negative deposits rates in Denmark

Maybe not truly natural, as this is a matter of currency intervention, but close.

After the ECB lowered its interest and deposit rates on Thursday, the Danish central bank, Nationalbanken, followed a few hours laterRead more

The negative carry universe

This is a follow-up to our post on “base money confusion“, which incorporates some of the ideas we’ve raised in our “beyond scarcity” series.

Let’s assume a few truths (we’re sure they’ll be up for debate, but here goes anyway): Read more

Negative yields at the house of Buba

Germany appears to have had a successful auction of six-month debt on Monday.

That said, there is a caveat. The auction for €3.9bn worth of paper achieved a bid-to-cover ratio of 1.8 versus a previous bid-to-cover of 3.8. The average yield was a negative 0.0122 per cent — a bit of an auction first. Read more

BNY Mellon to charge on $50m-plus deposits

Bank of New York Mellon said it would start charging a fee on large deposits in response to a “sudden” and “significant” increase in its balance sheet from investors searching for a haven to stash their cash. Accounts with an average deposit of more than $50m will be charged a 13 basis point annual fee on the excess and an additional fee if short-term Treasury bills produce negative yields. On Thursday, yields on one-month Treasury bills dipped as low as -0.0102, their lowest level since January last year, in turbulent financial markets across the world. Banks have seen an influx of cash deposits in recent weeks as the US Congress and White House struggled to reach agreement on an increase to the country’s debt ceiling. Regulators assured them that they would look sympathetically on any temporary breach of capital ratios. But BNY Mellon said in a letter to clients that the “extraordinary deposits” meant that fees were necessary to safeguard the “quality and strength” of its balance sheet. For more see FT Alphaville.

Flight to safety leads to negative interest rates

In the frantic flight to safety on Thursday, Treasury yields touched an all-time low of 26 basis points, the NY Times reports. Rates on even shorter-term credit, including six-month Treasury bills and overnight loans in the vast market for repurchase agreements, swung toward zero Thursday. Meanwhile Bank of New York Mellon said it would start charging a fee on large deposits in response to a “sudden” and “significant” increase in its balance sheet, the FT reports. Accounts with an average deposit of more than $50m will be charged a 13 basis point annual fee on the excess and an additional fee if short-term Treasury bills produce negative yields. Yields on one-month bills did fall into negative territory on Thursday, dipping as low as -.0102 per cent before closing at zero.