Posts tagged 'Labour Market'

FOMC vs the cruel, cruel summer

This morning’s Personal Income & Outlays report revealed the third consecutive monthly decline in core and headline PCE PI inflation (though August), both now just below 1.5 per cent:

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David Autor’s guide to labour and the machine

David Autor chooses a surprising quote for the start of his latest paper on automation and jobs:

In 1966, the philosopher Michael Polanyi observed, “We can know more than we can tell… The skill of a driver cannot be replaced by a thorough schooling in the theory of the motorcar; the knowledge I have of my own body differs altogether from the knowledge of its physiology.” Polanyi’s observation largely predates the computer era, but the paradox he identified—that our tacit knowledge of how the world works often exceeds our explicit understanding—foretells much of the history of computerization over the past five decades. Read more

Jobs of the future and the gender-norm challenge

Women hold about 60 per cent of the total jobs in the thirty occupations projected by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics to have the most net job growth in the decade through 2022.

That figure was calculated* recently by the National Women’s Law Center, which adds that eighteen of those thirty occupations are “female dominated, with workforces that are 60 per cent or more female”. Read more

Okay, we get it, BIS: fiscal policy is not your thing

The Bank for International Settlements says there’s a problem. Governments, by and large, haven’t done enough to address the issues that have emerged during/since the financial crisis. Some monetary policymakers have done rather a lot, but much of it is in unchartered territory and carries risks. So, says BIS, monetary policymakers should just stop it henceforth.

From the latest BIS annual report: Read more

Charts du jour, labour force participation kill the old edition

Self-explanatory, and they come via RBC Capital Markets:

Productivity, “reindustrialisation” and the US profit share

US industrial production has grown at least twice as fast as GDP since the start of the recovery.

Onshoring” work because wage differentials are narrowing plus falling electricity prices because of shale gas = more growth, so… great! Maybe? Read more