Posts tagged 'Inflation'

Ze price stability

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The core CPI-PCE inflation gap

Barclays economists write that the gap between core CPI and core PCE in the United States has widened to its largest in about a decade. They have an interesting note explaining some of the reasons why, though not all of them are clear and right now this is mainly an academic issue:

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Eurogloom

Some stagnant stats out of Eurostat on Tuesday….

Euro area unemployment rate at 12.1%
EU27 at 10.9%

Here’s the damage, broken down…  Read more

Have the inflation-paranoid capitulated?

Thursday’s 5-year US Treasury TIPS auction was something of a noteworthy one, according to Kit Juckes at Societe Generale. Click to enlarge…

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The changing nature of inflation

The IMF’s latest World Economic Outlook has made some very interesting observations about the changing nature and growing stability of inflation.

Most notable is the following chart:

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Cheap dates and weekend getaways

Don’t go to Australia (but do click to enlarge the charts):

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A new era for gold?

Here follows a thoughtful commentary on the changes going on in gold market from BNY Mellon’s Neil Mellor, including the point that central bank purchases are in many ways helping to stabilise what might otherwise be a much more substantial slump.

Our emphasis throughout… Read more

The real rate of British inflation

Cheery chap, Tim Morgan, chief economist at money broker Tullett Prebon. Here’s a few charts to warm us all up on a cold February day…

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This is not 1994

Dario Perkins at Lombard Street Research has a great little note out on Tuesday arguing why it’s absolutely wrong to assume the current bond sell-off is in any shape or form a repeat of 1994.

As he notes (our emphasis): Read more

The FT Alphaville podcast, with Dylan Grice

Welcome to FT Alphaville’s extraordinarily infrequent podcast… (click through for the podcast link).

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Capping the gold price

The following chart, we propose, has the potential to inspire a whole new way of looking at the gold and Treasury market:

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Stevens and the RBA hold the line

So Glenn Stevens likes the nags after all.

Well, sort of.

For the first time since he took the helm of the RBA in 2006, the governor did not tinker with interest rates on Melbourne Cup day (a public holiday across parts of the country). Read more

What inflation?

From the ECB’s September update on monetary developments in the euro-area released on Thursday:

That’s euroland M3 – the broad money supply measure — coming in below expectations and dropping again to 2.7. Really brings to mind Draghi’s warning to the Bundestag that “In our assessment, the greater risk to price stability is currently falling prices in some euro area countries”, doesn’t it? Read more

King’s defence of low interest rates during ‘The Great Stability’

Mervyn King gave a “personal assessment” of the inflation targeting regime over the past twenty years on Tuesday night. And seemed to suggest that it may be best to allow UK inflation to over-shoot the 2 per cent target given the current economic environment in order to minimise volatility. Read more

Why the UK output gap could be a chasm

Capital Economics put out a cracker of a note on UK output this week. It’s taken us a while to get through it but we wanted to do it justice. Here’s the key extract:

‘Supply pessimists’ point to high inflation and growing employment as evidence of a small output gap. But inflation was pushed up by temporary factors and has eased recently, while domestically generated inflation has remained low.

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Rubik’s Revolutions

We introduced our Rubiks QE analogy on Tuesday. This post is a continuation, in which we apply the analogy to the crisis so far.

Before we go on we should point out that the Rubik’s is a simplification, as are the concepts of “tomorrow money” and “today money”. There are and will always be areas that call for further explanation, but which we haven’t covered in this post. If they’ve been left out, it’s mostly due to post-length constraints. It’s not because we are wilfully ignoring them. Read more

Don’t call it money printing, Rubik’s cube edition

Last week FT Alphaville drew attention to the fact that HSBC had joined the cohorts of the “don’t call QE money-printing” brigade. We thought this was great progress for the mainstream analyst community.

Moreover, we thought their explanation was really good. Read more

HSBC: Don’t say printing!

This is reassuring (or not – we can’t decide). The Global fixed income strategy team at HSBC *believe* they’ve come up with a non-consensus view on the effects of QEternity:

Our non-consensus view is that QE3 will drive US Treasury yields to new lows Read more

The expectations bluff

“Mad. Mad. Mad. Bernanke’s gone totally MAD, I tell you!”

“What’s he thinking with QEternity? It’s so inflationary. AGHH!” Read more

A bear bath

“The Fed will destroy the world”

As top lines go it’s pretty decent… and when you follow up with a pic of a strategist in a bath you leave us no choice but to post (we tried to resist, we really did): Read more

A time of hoarding and inflation fears, 1930s edition

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MOST: “The reflation trade may not have long legs”

For all the talk of heightened inflation expectations on the back of QE3, Morgan Stanley analysts remain unconvinced.

The truth, according to them, is that central bank action is having less than its desired effect. In fact, inflation expectations have remained well behaved if not subdued. Read more

RIP (old) RPI and hello a happier Chancellor

The Office for National Statistics is out to get the Retail Price Index… or at least the part of responsible for the ‘formula effect gap’. But before we get to the sexy stuff — involving gilts and clauses and all — a quick statistical primer is called for.

The RPI began life as a compensation index, developed as an aid to protect ordinary British workers from price increases associated with WWI. It didn’t become the main domestic measure of inflation until much later. Read more

Great Tips-pectations

US 10-year Tips breakeven rates are surging, and talk of a revival in inflation expectations is, understandably, doing the rounds.

But we’re not entirely convinced that it is that simple. Read more

Why it doesn’t matter if China sells its USTs

Earlier this week Paul Krugman went out of his way to point out that if China stopped buying US bonds, it wouldn’t be the end of the world.

We wanted to come back to some of his points, because well, we think they are pretty good. Read more

No grain, no pain

A couple of charts from Barclays economists showing the relative contribution of food to headline and core CPI:

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China data inspires hope, disappointment… and a dilemma

Oh yay, Chinese consumer price inflation for July came in at a nicely subdued looking 1.8 per cent. And industrial production growth continued to slow. Q2 wasn’t the bottom after all. More easing ahoy! Right?

Not so fast… Read more

The Fed, pacing

UPDATE:

The biggest change is in the very first paragraph. In June the Fed had written that the economy “has been expanding moderately”. Now economic activity has “decelerated somewhat over the first half of this year.” Read more

The parable of water

Presenting an economic journey in felt, looking at whether the system’s ails have more to do with an abundance of goods than a shortage of credit because of the system’s technological advances and efficiencies. Move ahead to slide 20 for a snapshot of where we *think* we are today.

1) The water source. Read more

Discuss among yourselves, inflation trend path comparison edition

A chart from Market Monetarist:

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