Posts tagged 'IMF'

This one time, at band camp, the PBOC did this thing

China weakened the renminbi fixing by 1.86 per cent overnight, an unexpected move followed by the biggest one-day change in the value of the renminbi since the country abandoned its dollar peg for a managed trading band.

There are two schools of thought on this: Either balance of payment problems are forcing China’s hand, or the move is just another step in the slow and benign process of capital liberalisation.

On the first, well hey, they would depreciate in the current environment wouldn’t they? Exports are weak, the economy is sputtering, and the stock market can’t stay up without the state introducing a ban on it going down.

Move to a free-floating currency system? Meh. This is just another desperate devaluation story in the style of Nigeria, Russia before them and even peg busting Saudi Arabia on the back of a hard-currency drought in the offshore FX market. (FT Alphaville has predicted this for like ages, yeah?). Read more

IMF Debt Sustainability Assessments of Greece (and others)

In this guest post, former IMF staffer Peter Doyle castigates the institution’s flip-flopping over Greece…

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No really, here’s how we’d restructure Greece’s debt, by the IMF

Here is another very strange, and short, document. Click to read.

It’s an update to the Greek debt sustainability analysis by IMF staff — yes one of those analyses again — which was originally published just before Greece’s July 5th referendum. Read more

A summary of the Greek crisis for the benefit of fintech people

They say crises define movements and people.

If that’s the case, purveyors of fintech payment solutions could soon be defined as those who stood ready to exploit a Greek national bankruptcy crisis for the benefit of “onboarding” users. Read more

How we would have restructured Greece’s debt, by the IMF

Here is an earnest, but very strange, document. Click to read.

It’s a Greek debt sustainability analysis by IMF staff. Yes, one of those analyses. A preliminary one, but in many ways the DSA to end all DSAs. Read more

Defaulting on the IMF: a stupid idea whose time had come

This belief — that an implicit official sector guarantee has quietly settled over every sovereign debt instrument issued by every geopolitically significant country on the planet — is a fallacy. The moral hazard implications of allowing this idea to prosper are staggering. More importantly, the official sector lacks the resources to make good on such an implicit guarantee, even if it wanted to do so.

– Lee Buchheit, ‘Sovereign fragility’, 2014

Coming home to roost now though, isn’t it? Read more

On those creditor ‘red lines’ for Greece

In this guest post, former IMF staffer Peter Doyle argues that in pushing for pensions, VAT and labour reforms, creditors are only stoking the latent explosiveness of Greece…

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Troika-Greek negotiations are reportedly down to the wire over early-retirement pensions, VAT, and labor reforms: the IMF says all are non-negotiable; Tsipras, perhaps inadvertently echoing Mrs. Thatcher, has, so far, responded “No! No! No!”

These three issues converge on those at the upper end of their working lives, the 50-74 year old cohort, and are reflected in its participation and unemployment behavior. So it is worth considering data on those and the associated implications for the negotiations. Doing so suggests that these creditor red lines lack foundation. Read more

Guest post: Do IMF-set primary surplus targets for the EZ periphery pass the smell test?

Spoiler alert. In this guest post, former IMF staffer Peter Doyle, argues that some participants in the on-going Greek crisis might be suffering from anosmia…

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It seems it’s time to get un-bored again with Greece

A flurry of fresh headlines: Greek stocks pummelled; “Air of unreality” as IMF quits talks. A seemingly credible report from Germany’s Bild saying Angela has resigned herself to possible Grexit.

There was that aggressive Giavazzi op-ed in the FT.

Oh, and 10,000 Greeks have taken their own lives over the past five years of crisis, according to Theodoros Giannaros, a public hospital governor, whose own son committed suicide after losing his job.

Maybe this is the end, end game. Read more

For Greece, a (temporary) post-dated cheque solution…

A post-dated cheque without the drawing rights, that is.

As Tsipras and co stagger towards the next IMF payment deadline on Friday, all the while spitting furiously about the supposed abolition of democracy in Europe, it seems extraordinary that Greece has made it thus far without an event. Consider the payment schedule so far, from JP Morgan, published at the beginning of March… Read more

A glimpse inside the Court, IMF edition

With a big h/t to Faisal Islam, here’s what the Bank of England was thinking at the start of September and just before that IMF loan in 1976 (do click through for the full thing):

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Of negative rates and reserve managers

Might have to pop this at the top, it’s a chart with lots of negative yield stuff on it after all:

Now, as we have said before… friends don’t let friends extrapolate too wildly from the IMF’s COFER data.  Read more

Just another case of the heebie-GGBies?

In this guest post, Gabriel Sterne, head of global macro research, Oxford Economics, looks at previous large drawdowns in Greek bond prices for clues about the future.

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou “asked our partners to contribute decisively in order to give Greece a safe harbour” five years ago this week.

Since then, Greek government bond (GGB) prices have plunged by 37 per cent — or more! — four separate times, with one amazing long rally in between: Read more

Guest post: The Euro and the IMF Now

Here’s former IMF staffer Peter Doyle , with some bold advice from the wings of the IMF Spring meetings…

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Your October 2014 flash crash, charted

Courtesy of the IMF and spotted by Toby Nangle, do click to enlarge:

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Guest post: IMF Spring hubbub

Thousands of officials, journalists, academics and market professionals will soon be in Washington DC for the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, from April 17 to 19. Former IMF staffer Peter Doyle advises attendees on what to really ask the IMF.

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Another spring, another IMF Spring Meeting, another set of IMF platitudes—a two-, three- (or is it four?)-speed, variably geometric, or airline metaphoric world economy, making progress, more to do, notably for the poor, sundry complacencies and risks to beware. Even Occupy has been put to sleep by these rituals.

But much goes on behind this veil of blur. Here are five steps to get to what matters. Read more

IMF abdication on Greece

This guest post is from Peter Doyle, an economist and former IMF staffer

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In an otherwise sound critique of Mr. Varoufakis’ list of proposals for Greek government policies last week, Mme. Lagarde’s letter to Mr. Dijsselbloem contains an additional, unremarked, but revealing element. After saying that, in the IMF’s view, the Greek list was sufficiently comprehensive to be a valid starting point for a successful conclusion of the review, she added:

… but a determination in this regard should of course rest primarily on an assessment by Member States themselves and by the relevant European institutions.

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Sovereign debt reprofiling: Ukraine’s lesson for the IMF

This week’s $40bn IMF programme announced for Ukraine will include some restructuring of its debt. Gabriel Sterne, head of global macro research at Oxford Economics, points out that it comes at an interesting time for the fund’s policy on restructuring.

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The IMF’s proposals to change its policy on sovereign debt reprofiling have divided opinion, with FT Alphaville providing a debating platform between supporters (for example here and here) and sceptics including myself (for example here and here).

The proposals are motivated by the objective of providing a fund programme breathing space to work when it is unclear if debt is unsustainable. Read more

Guest post: The case for sovereign reprofiling the IMF way, part two

‘Reprofiling’ is a controversial word in the world of sovereign debt at the moment. The IMF is gathering responses on a proposal to extend bond maturities when a country’s debt looks like it might be unsustainable going into a programme.

In this post, having reviewed criticisms of the proposal, Lee Buchheit, Mitu Gulati and Ignacio Tirado discuss how reprofiling can be designed to avoid hostility from creditors. Read more

Guest post: The case for sovereign reprofiling the IMF way, part one

‘Reprofiling’ is a controversial word in the world of sovereign debt at the moment. The IMF is gathering responses on a proposal to extend bond maturities when a country’s debt looks like it might be unsustainable going into a programme.

In this post, Lee Buchheit, Mitu Gulati and Ignacio Tirado review criticisms of the proposal — and suggest some responses. Read more

Guest post: The Riksbank at zero — lessons for others

Sweden’s Riksbank cut its key interest rate to zero last week because inflation was too low. The Riksbank has been noted – and criticised – for raising rates in 2011 to tackle a credit and housing bubble. Peter Doyle, an economist and former mission chief for Sweden for the IMF, argues that the recent experience of the world’s oldest central bank has more to teach policymakers.

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One view of the Swedish Riksbank’s cutting its repo rate to zero is that this is a defeat for the use of monetary instruments to lean against financial fragilities. That conclusion is premature. It misses three more important implications for other monetary policymakers. Read more

Guest post: IMF policies in the next crisis – unsuitable with a high probability

It’s that time of year again for the IMF-World Bank annual meetings in Washington – which means time for reflection on the fund’s attitude to changes in sovereign debt restructuring. Gabriel Sterne, Head of Global Macro Investor Relations at Oxford Economics, argues why it might be time for less procrastination, and more ‘forward guidance’…

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Ukraine, war, and sovereign default

Ukraine claimed at pixel time to have fired on a number of Russian tanks crossing its borders.

Being invaded by Russia is not very conducive to a country’s GDP. But also, bizarre as it seems if its armour really is aflame in the Donbas, Russia is also the owner of Ukrainian sovereign debt. This has some precarious terms (for the borrower) restricting growth in debt to GDP to below 60 per cent. Read more

Sovereign debt reprofiling, take two — from the IMF

The IMF has picked its week to publish another paper on changing its sovereign debt restructuring policy…

Although the paper released on Friday — which follows an initial review last year — isn’t about Argentina, pari passu, and holdout issues. It’s about Greece. Read more

Portugal courts confidence

A tick up in sovereign bond yields has followed Friday’s late announcement by the Portuguese Constitutional Court that some budget austerity measures are a no-no, for violating principles of equality and proportionality.

Benchmark 10-year yields rose 7 basis points to 3.72 percent, according to Reuters, with weakness also seen in other euro zone peripheral government bonds.

The FT notes the need for tax rises and, while the country has exited the official bailout programme, there are still risks to a further package of rescue loans. Read more

Rothschilds look for $30tn capitalism fix

There was no bald supervillain stroking a white cat, but other than that the City of London hosted a conspiracy theorists’ perfect scenario yesterday: a meeting organised by the Rothschilds, sponsored by the Rockefellers and with managers of $30tn, or more than a tenth of all financial assets worldwide, in the room. Even the British royal family was represented, essential for any decent conspiracy, although usually Prince Philip is preferred to the Prince of Wales.

Perhaps there were shape-shifting reptilians present, as per David Icke. But if so, they were keeping their heads down: rather than discussing how to rule the world, the focus was on “inclusive capitalism”. Read more

It’s Mostly Fiscal, Ukraine edition

The currency devaluation and official borrowing (to help finance a still-wide government deficit) are expected to push public sector debt up to 57 percent of GDP…

IMF announcement of $17bn loan programme for Ukraine

Although don’t worry — that’s a whole 3 per cent before a unique debt threshold clause conceivably allows the Russian government to convert $3bn of Ukrainian bonds, which it owns, into demand money. Read more

Guest post: The IMF approach to sovereign debt restructuring

This year’s IMF-World Bank Spring Meeting is likely to include discussion of proposals to change the fund’s policy on sovereign debt restructuring. Gabriel Sterne, senior economist at Exotix with IMF experience, and Charles Blitzer, Principal at Blitzer Consulting and a former IMF staff member, argue in favour of a case-by-case approach.

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