Posts tagged 'Greece'

Greek government finds it can’t have its moussaka and eat it

Greece has had a break from the headlines recently, but how long can it last? With a banking system that’s soon going to need shoring up again, probably not long. Read more

Don’t call it a boondoggle

Greece paid up to 40 cents in the euro for one of the bond in its buyback. Average price: 33.8 cents in the euro.

Or rather wants to pay. It has “advised… official creditors” that it wants another €1.29bn in EFSF notes to purchase all of the bonds tendered, up from the original €10bn.

The results, in table form via this release (click to enlarge): Read more

If you’re going to CAC, now might be a good time — Greece edition

Yep, this is a Greece post in a series on Argentina and the pari passu saga.

We’ll explain. Read more

An (extended) offer from Greece…

Click for details. The Greek PSI bond buyback now closes at 12pm London time on December 11.


Now, is this supposed to be a veiled threat if investors choose not to tend their bonds? From the Greek debt office chief, Stelios Papadopoulos: Read more

Greece joins cool circle

You’re just not cool these days if you aren’t operating some sort of circular mechanism to reduce your debt levels in the eyes of the outside world. And it appears that Greece, sick of being bullied by the circular crew, is looking to get in on the act.

We’re talking about the Greek debt buyback, which should be completed on Friday if deadline talk is to be believed. Read more

You’re in selective default (again), S&P tells Greece [updated]

No explanation had been given by S&P at pixel time. [Update: it's pasted below the jump.] But the situation is pretty clear: Greece’s “voluntary” buyback of the PSI bonds is being carried out in distressed conditions (ie it will otherwise lose eurozone financial support). Read more

A Dutch auction for Greece…

Click for details.

 Read more

So, who’s going to sell their Greek bonds?

Much has been made of the buyback announced as part of the latest Greek debt reduction deal. Mainly because more than half of total debt savings agreed are expected to come from the buyback, according to this leaked doc.

The details of how the scheme is might actually work are pretty thin on the ground, but we know from the leak that the plan is to spend €10.2bn (from the EFSF most likely) buying back and retiring bonds. It is expected that this will lead to a reduction of 11 per cent of GDP by 2020. Read more

Find “projected debt-to-GDP ratio” where country = “Greece”; run eyeroll.exe

Gary Jenkins of Swordfish Research aspired to have more thoughts on the latest Greek debt deal by Wednesday morning. Alas, it was not to be:

I was hoping that having had a further twenty four hours to digest the Greek debt sustainability plan that I would have a lot to add to yesterday’s comments, but I don’t. There have been press reports (FT) that the measures to be implemented will only bring the debt/GDP figure down to 126.6% rather than the 124% announced but I think by now we are all used to the initial figures released being subject to revision pretty quickly.

We agree — the figures around Greece always come with implied aspiration. Read more

A ‘broader concept of debt sustainability’ for Greece (feat. OSI-lite)

The IMF’s desired target of a 120 per cent debt-to-GDP ratio by 2020 has been replaced by 124 per cent by the same date — thanks in large part to official creditors taking a lower interest rate on repayments from the original bailout. A lot also seems to hinge on the Greek debt ‘buyback boondoggle’, which is now well and truly on the table.  Read more

A mere three weeks later, a Greek debt deal [updated]

A deal, a late-night press conference, an inevitable fudging of the numbers. You know the rules.

Eurogroup officials will hold a press conference on Monday night at 11pm CET – or at least, that’s the time given in this link… Read more

Five seven five / Is unsustainable, so / Haircut to seven

One of the following is an autumnal haiku composed on Twitter by Herman van Rompuy, President of the European Council. But which is it?

The night has fallen
The bare branches can be seen
Even more lonely Read more

Cut out and keep, charting Greek OSI edition

Hat-tip to the FT’s Brussels blog

Click t0 enlarge — a Eurogroup chart guide on how to cut Greece’s official debt levels (a buyback boondoggle included): Read more

Eurogroup meets for third go at kicking can down the road

The Eurogroup meets on Monday for the third time in as many weeks to discuss Greece’s finances. Maybe third time’s the charm?

The focus remains on getting an agreement on the country’s medium-term debt sustainability. The reason for that is two-fold. First, it’s necessary to appease the IMF given its insistence on a haircut (which is politically very difficult for many of the member countries). Second, with the German elections taking place next September, it’s seen as best for all concerned to agree some sort of solution that will allow the question of Greece’s longer-term sustainability to be ignored until late 2013. Read more

Those ‘technical’ issues that broke up last night’s Eurogroup meeting

About that meeting of eurozone finance ministers, ECB and IMF officials that collapsed in the early hours of this morning (at least, until Monday) for ‘further technical work’…

First: looks like our bold call was correct. Um, yay?

Second, Reuters says it has the document prepared for the meeting and circulated among the ministers. Read more

Eurogroup meeting, interrupted

Statement:

20 November 2012

Statement by the Eurogroup President, Jean-Claude Juncker

The Eurogroup welcomed the staff-level agreement reached between the Troika and the Greek authorities on updated programme conditionality, including a wide range of far reaching measures in the areas of fiscal consolidation, structural reforms, privatisation and financial sector stabilisation.

 Read more

Bold AV call on Eurogroup discussion on Greece: No decision

There are so many aspects surrounding Greece’s ongoing refinancing needs still up in the air, it should come as no surprise that the agenda for Tuesday’s meeting of European finance ministers has reportedly been shrunk to addressing how an immediate €15bn gap can be bridged through to 2014. A further €17.6bn seemingly required to take the country through to 2016 can be discussed later. Read more

On Greek elephants

While Lagarde and Juncker go at it in the policymaker equivalent of hammer and tongs over timetables, there’s a risk here of people forgetting the numbers involved. Because they don’t add up.

Consider these two tables from David Mackie at JP Morgan. Click to enlarge. Read more

Introducing the ‘youth sacrifice ratio’

Not the kind of youth sacrifice once practiced by the Aztecs, the Inca, and the Carthaginians in order please distant, fickle gods if course. We’ve moved on a bit since then.

Then again, it’s still the younger generation that generally draws the short straw in a crisis… Read more

A €5bn Greek bond imminently falling due? Did we mention we have deckchairs by this abyss?

So, we’re going to the wire once again in the now traditional dance between Greece and the troika. As the FT reported on Thursday:

Eurozone leaders face a new round of brinkmanship over Greece’s €174bn bailout after international lenders failed to bridge differences on how to reduce Athens’ burgeoning debt levels, pushing the country perilously close to defaulting on a €5bn debt payment due next week.

 Read more

In Greece, Antonis Sisyphus took another painful step forward

Pushing a fresh austerity package (the price of financing the next stage of the country’s bailout) through parliament on Wednesday night cost the Greek government and Antonis Samaras, the centre-right prime minister, dearly. And while there is no guarantee a repeat performance can be staged, there is every probability the boulder will slip and one will be demanded. Read more

Oh, for a Greek version of Nate Silver

From Gary Jenkins at Swordfish Research:

Strange to think that over 100 million votes cast in the US may have less impact upon the markets over the next month or so than some 300 votes due to be cast in the Greek parliament this evening.

 Read more

Athens grinds to a halt

The Greek parliament will vote late Wednesday on the structural reforms and budget cuts demanded by the Troika. Reports suggest that the government will be able to get a majority. But in a last minute attempt to derail the vote, the country’s two main labour unions called a 48 hour general strike that started today.

These are the some of the scenes: Read more

Coalition troubles in Athens

There are some worrying signs about the strength of the Greek government coalition building this week. Between voting abstentions, public disagreements and new strikes, it’s looking ever bleaker. Read more

Greek government acquires more realistic crystal ball

Greece’s new budget was announced on Wednesday. With it came projections for the country’s economic health. The patient is not well. Even before the government’s own-self assessment of conditions, revisions by the IMF alone revealed the deterioration, as Exotix’s Gabriel Sterne points out in a note on Thursday. More of his analysis further down, but first this from the FT on the Greek government’s figuresRead more

‘Greek limbo’ is two words. TWO!

So, the Greek government has left this latest, very long, round of eurozone marriage counselling to head into, well, predictable domestic acrimony with headlines like “Crucial Test for Greek Coalition” trailing in its wake. From the ekathimerini:

“We did everything we could. We achieved significant improvements,” noting that Greece would remain in the euro if the package was passed and otherwise risked “descending into chaos.” “It is now down to the sense of responsibility of all political parties and each individual MP,” Samaras said.

Democratic Left issued a rejection within minutes, saying it does not agree with the outcome of negotiations with troika and repeating its objection to labor reforms.

JP Morgan’s Alex White points out that the next few weeks are going to be critical and that this one is likely going to the wire… again. Read more

Germany wants Greece to hand over more budget control

It looks like Germany has decided that Greece hasn’t given up quite enough of its sovereignty yet. We know that Wolfgang Schaeuble wants to set up an escrow account to make sure loan installments stay out of Athens’ reach (in order to guarantee that debt repayments are made to creditors). But it seems that Berlin also wants to put any money from a Greek primary surplus into that account. Read more

Eurozone wage adjustment, charted

Or peripheral pain in terms of growth/shrinkage in compensation per employee. It offers a striking illustration of why both Greeks and Germans have reason to feel peeved… Read more

The return of the Greek buyback (boondoggle)

We’re feeling very nostalgic. From the WSJ:

Euro-zone countries are considering a proposal that would see Greece cut its debt by buying back bonds held by private creditors at a discount.

The exercise–one of a number of options being studied–could persuade the International Monetary Fund to sign off on a loan payment desperately needed by the debt-laden country and keep Greece’s bailout on track for the medium term, two officials with direct knowledge of the discussions said Thursday.

 Read more

Troika negotiators escape to Olympic Villa… oh, wait.

The euro is dropping and Talthybius-wire has a few suggestions why. Our money is on the fugitive.

 Read more