Posts tagged 'FX'

Negativity all the way down

Not sure how many more pixels you’ll tolerate us spilling on the BoJ’s move negative, but this from Simon Derrick at Bank of New York Mellon seems worth your time. With our emphasis, and pars broken up for online readability:

Whether or not the BOJ’s decision was a direct reaction to the ECB’s decision to potentially push even further into negative territory doesn’t really matter. Indeed, it doesn’t even really matter whether or not the BOJ was trying to weaken the JPY by their move (in our opinion plausible deniability remains a key tool for central bankers).

What does matter is that four of the eight members of G8 (France, Germany, Italy and Japan) now have an official negative deposit rate while Canada continues to suffer the impact of collapsing oil prices (Russia, which has had its membership suspended, suffers from the same issue of course).

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The Plaza Accord, then and *cough* now?

Which leads us, naturally, to a partial Fed transcript from August 1985:  Read more

Rub falling, greater dollarisation risked, FX analysts speechless

Bank of Russia Governor Elvira Nabiullina is leaving it to the market to imagine when a ruble collapse will pose a threat to financial stability and force policy makers into action.

So far it hasn’t, and the currency is close to its “fundamental levels,” Nabiullina said in an interview on Wednesday. Other top officials also took the crisis in their stride, with President Vladimir Putin saying that changes in the exchange rate are actually opening up “additional opportunities” for some businesses.

- Bloomberg, Jan 21

- Markets, Jan 21 Read more

It’s all connected, CNY edition

From Societe Generale’s analysts over the weekend, with our emphasis, on the fallout from the weakening yuan on the European Central Bank, and why that might circle back (and back again):

Global currency markets have taken their cue from China and commodities, and the resulting shifts are causing something of a headache for the major central banks. Since the low of last spring, the euro has bounced back by just over 9% trade-weighted. Similar moves have been observed for the JPY and USD, with the bulk of depreciation coming from EM commodity currencies. Their status as funding currencies has even seen the euro and yen gain against the dollar in recent weeks

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Hi, my name’s Random Bank and I’ll be your financial server today (Updated)

Tips. The ultimate example of “unbundled” costs and discretionary performance-based income.

There are service staff who rely extensively on tips (waiting staff, bartenders, hairdressers, shoe-shiners, doormen, taxi drivers, hospitality staff, street entertainers) and then there are service staff which weirdly don’t (handymen, nurses, airline hostesses, Uber drivers, carers and a plethora of others).

So what to make of a fintech start-up, Xendpay, which would like to encourage discretionary tipping for foreign exchange services? Read more

The ECB is different (and should be treated as such)

We wrote — when talking about the ECB’s potential move to a tiered depo facility which would allow a deeper cut than expected into negative territory on Thursday – that Draghi was in the somewhat relaxed position of being able to follow where other central banks had gone before.

We were of course referring to the Swiss and Danish central banks, which are currently at -75bps versus the ECB’s -20bps and have in place versions of the tiered model being mooted for the ECB.

But… Nomura’s Jens Nordvig thinks we were being too casual in our comparison. The ECB needs to be analysed as its own central bank because: Read more

Your pending local currency-commodity downfall

Which came first the commodity fall or the local currency collapse? And, more importantly, how far through the commodity supply/ demand adjustment are we?

The suggestion here from SocGen’s Kit Juckes and friends is that the causality runs from commods to currencies and that there is still a lot of pain to come:

My colleague Michael Haigh has done a lot of work on the overall state of supply and demand in commodity markets, and he makes one very striking observation: For all the fall in the prices of many industrial and agricultural commodity prices in USD terms, the prices in the currency of the biggest producers have not necessarily fallen much. Sugar prices have fallen by over 8% this year in USD terms, but the Brazilian real has fallen by 29%. Copper prices have collapsed, down over 20%, but the Chilean peso is down 15% and trying hard to keep up. Gold is down 9%, but the South African rand has fallen by twice as much and in rand terms, the gold price is near its highs. The fall in iron ore prices (over 30%) is twice the fall by the Australian dollar, but you get the picture (Charts 1 and 2).

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Your updated guide to being an EM FX bull, now with bonus prayer

We might have to start an “x is less terrifying” series.

Consider this on EM FX…

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Asian reserve drawdowns, then vs now

Then being the ‘taper tantrum’ in 2013.

Now being the recent China devaluation episode that caught so much of EM FX in its backdraft.

From Goldman’s chief FX strategist Robin Brooks, and with our emphasis: Read more

Here’s relooking at Chinese FX reserves

Not so bad this month, particularly when you take into account expectations and the headline $94bn fall we saw in August.

From Nomura:

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It’s not the 1930s so…

Currency wars are either everywhere or nowhere. We know that much.

What we also probably know is that currency devaluations in today’s environment are indeed approaching beggar thy neighbour policy without commitments to be irresponsible and/ or supportive fiscal action.  Read more

Debunking quantitative tightening in one paragraph?

And here’s that paragraph, from JPM’s Niko Panigirtzoglou and team, with our emphasis:

  • First, we disagree with the description that FX reserve depletion is QE in reverse. This is because the FX reserve depletion that is happening currently is not an exogenous policy action but represents a policy reaction to capital flows out of EM. But the capital that leaves EM does not disappear from the financial system. In fact, the capital that flows out of EM could find its way back into DM bonds. For example three major manifestations of capital flowing out of EM are 1) the reduction of dollar denominated debt previously issued by EM corporates, 2) the accumulation of dollar deposits by domestic EM corporates or other entities who try to protect themselves against further dollar appreciation, and 3) the withdrawal of EM currency (e.g. Renminbi deposits) by foreign investors who in turn convert them back into dollar deposits.

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If something can’t go on forever, it won’t, China’s FX policy edition

From Barc on what’s happened since the PBoC got messy at band camp, devalued, and followed up with a “dirty peg”:

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China’s ongoing FX trilemma and its possible consequences

From UBS’s Tao Wang on what, post China’s surprise revaluation, is now an oft used phrase, the impossible trinity — AKA the corner China finds itself in:

The impossible trinity says that a country cannot simultaneously have an open capital account, independent monetary policy, and stable tightly managed exchange rate. Some academics (such as Hélène Rey) argue that since capital controls are no longer as effective in the current day world, complete monetary policy independence is still not possible without some degree of exchange rate flexibility, even without a fully open capital account – or impossibly duality.

Regardless of whether it is an impossible trinity or duality, the fact is that in recent years, as a result of substantial capital controls relaxation, China has found it increasingly difficult to manage independent monetary policy while simultaneously maintaining a fixed exchange rate.

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Of China’s “dirty peg” and spreading EM pain

Jim Reid at Deutsche assesses the damage so far. As he says, this has something of a taper tantrum feel to it but seperating out China from Fed fear is a tough job even if given “that the odds of a September hike are fading again (32% this morning, down 16% over the last 48 hours)” it seems “China and the impact on EM is the overriding driver”.

With our emphasis:

One of the big problems with China’s FX move is that although they’ve ‘only’ seen a 3% currency fall (in the onshore Yuan) since their announcement last week, others have subsequently followed suit either deliberately or via market [and oil based] pressure. The following countries have seen their currency depreciate at least 4% since last Monday (and using last night’s closing prices): Kazakhstan (leading the way with a huge 26% devaluation following the removal of the trading band), Russia, Ghana, Guinea, Colombia, Belarus, Turkey, Malaysia and Algeria. In fact, if we extended the analysis to include those that have seen at least a 3% depreciation then the number of countries hits 17 and unsurprisingly all sit in the EM bracket.

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We know what the euro is doing to Greece…

But, as the foreign press corp does its best to hurry some much needed euro into the Greek economy, we should also look at what Greece is doing to the euro.

Here’s Nomura’s head of FX, Jens Nordvig, on what to watch where the single, now more parlous, currency is concerned: Read more

Peru’s FX swappy central bank intervention

This is a snapshot of the Peruvian economy’s growing dependency on central bank intervention by way of BNP Paribas on Tuesday,

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Your brave euro

As SocGen’s Kit Juckes says, the main topic in currency markets may be the resilience of the euro in the face of the ongoing Greek tragedy (ed – no, sorry) comedy (ed- really now, no) thing.

I wouldn’t know. I’ve been on holidays.

But in case that’s true, here’s Nomura’s Jens Nordvig on why it might be holding up. Read more

Oh you want your FX to be instant? That’s extra

Dan Davies’ cynical guide to fintech was so good and made so many worthy points we’ve decided to launch a new FT Alphaville series to pay homage to it.

For those who didn’t read the original, Davies basically broke down the supposedly “disruptive” fintech models in the market into seven core categories (*only one of which is arguably innovative). Read more

Every day we’re sorry, by $53m

An expensive business, banking. There’s offices, staff, technology, terminals, compliance…

Actually, maybe it would be wise to spend a bit more on the last one. The FT’s running total of legal fines and settlements paid by banks to US regulators since 2007 now comes to $155bn.

In case you were wondering, over eight years that works out to $53m per day (including weekends, because client service is a 24 hour kind of business, right.) Read more

Of negative rates and reserve managers

Might have to pop this at the top, it’s a chart with lots of negative yield stuff on it after all:

Now, as we have said before… friends don’t let friends extrapolate too wildly from the IMF’s COFER data.  Read more

Another winter of discontent?

At first glance, America’s latest growth figures don’t look so good. We generally refrain from commenting on quarterly GDP data because, among other reasons, the numbers are naturally noisy and they’re often revised by large amounts. (Or as the Fed says, “transitory factors,” although probably not the weather.) Those caveats out of the way, there are a few interesting points in this report that are worth noting.

Let’s start with a theoretical exercise. Imagine it were one year ago today, and someone told you that, between then and the end of this past March, the price of oil would fall by about half and that the real, trade-weighted dollar would appreciate by more than 10 per cent. A reasonable person would expect two things: big cutbacks in domestic oil investment that wouldn’t initially have been offset by higher investment elsewhere, and a hit to net exports.

None of this would have told you anything about would happen to total spending, but it would have provided guidance on how the composition of spending would change. Read more

EM FX and the case for calm

It’s apparently sorely needed, if this from Nomura’s Jens Nordvig on EM FX pessimism is anything to go by:

During my presentation [at Nomura's annual central bank conference], I asked a number of simple questions about currencies. One of them was on the 2015 outlook for EM currencies – 67% of the audience was bearish, with the rest evenly split between bullish and neutral, a pretty extreme result, as these polls usually have a lot of neutral answers.

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There’s no right to parity

Is this nuts?

…the speed of the Euro depreciation is starting to look very fast. We are in the 99th percentile (at least) of 3M, 6M, 9M, and 12M moves since initiation in 1999.

- Nordvig, Nomura

Over the last eight months the USD has appreciated faster on a trade-weighted basis than at any time in the last 40 years and probably over a longer, much longer duration.

- Englander, Citi

Which, again, looks like this: Read more

Once you cross-subsidise bank services can you ever go back?

Alternative title: First mover dis-advantage in banking

In early 2013 the Financial Stability Board asked a group chaired by Paul Fisher of the Bank of England and RBA assistant governor Guy Debelle to formulate a set of proposals to improve the FX benchmark process and reduce the scope for manipulation.

Debelle gave an update on progress in a speech this week in Sydney.

As he noted, the group’s work was conducted separately from the investigations into allegations of FX manipulation and group members did not have access to any of the evidence gathered. Furthermore, while the concluding reported outlined 15 recommendations, none of these were explicitly embodied in regulation. The expectation instead was for the recommendations to be voluntarily implemented by market participants, on the basis were they not acted on, authorities could conclude that a regulatory response was necessary to generate the desired improvement in market structure and conduct. Read more

The trading magicians of Plus500

Plus500 is an unusual member of the retail foreign exchange trading world. The London-listed group offers contracts for difference on currencies, as well as stocks, indices, exchange traded funds, and commodities, but it is unusual in the way it is structured, the way it operates and, above all, the way it is spectacularly profitable.

More on all that below, but to begin let’s focus on the recent move in the Swiss Franc versus the Euro. The decision by the Swiss central bank to remove the cap on the value of the franc prompted very large moves for the currency, blowing up some currency trading platforms and prompting unexpected losses throughout the financial system.

Plus500, however, suffered “no material impact on the Company’s financial and trading position”, an incredible result. Read more

Just how big a day was Jan 15 for FX markets?

The first numbers by way of CLS, the continuous link settlement system used by the vast majority of the FX market to settle transactions, are in.

As Nick Murray-Leslie tells FT Alphaville on Wednesday:

CLS settled a record number of transactions following the decision by the Swiss National Bank to remove a currency ceiling against the euro.

CLS settled 2.26 million transactions on 20 January, totalling USD 9.2 trillion with 99.5% of these transactions were settled within 45 minutes.”

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FXCM, welcome to the ‘cov-heavy’ reality…

The price of life in retail FX land….

The loan has an initial interest rate of 10% per annum, increasing by 1.5% per annum each quarter for so long as it is outstanding, but in no event exceeding 17% per annum (before giving effect to any applicable default rate). It is also subject to various conditions and terms such as requiring mandatory prepayments, including from proceeds of dispositions, condemnation and insurance proceeds, debt issuances, and equity issuances. The credit agreement includes a variety of restrictive covenants, including, but not limited to, limitations on the ability to merge, dissolve, liquidate, consolidate or sell, lease or otherwise transfer all or substantially all assets; limitations on the incurrence of liens; limitations on the incurrence of debt by subsidiaries of the company; and limitations on transactions with affiliates, without the prior consent of the lender.

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The Great China FX Outflow

As Goldman flagged this morning, December has brought with it $19bn of FX outflows from China. That’s the biggest move since 2007 (with our emphasis):

The position of FX purchases for the entire banking system (the PBOC plus commercial banks) decreased by about $19bn in December (vs. essentially flat in November)…

The FX outflow in December underlined the weakness in demand for the CNY, despite a strong trade balance of close to $50bn. The FX outflow size is the largest since December 2007 (and this earlier data point was skewed by the MOF’s FX injection in China’s sovereign wealth fund). The PBOC has been setting the daily USDCNY fix on the strong side of the spot rate since late November to counteract depreciation expectations. Today’s data suggest that besides displaying such a bias in fix setting, the central bank might have gone further in supporting the currency by buying CNY in the market. But we await PBOC balance sheet data, due out in the coming weeks, to confirm if it is indeed the case. The FX outflow also partly explains the slow M2 growth in December.

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Death of an FX punter

terriegym:

Ive came back to my computer and Alpari have closed all my trades, loosing over $1000 off of my current balance, anyone got any idea what may have happened!!! they arent answering the phone!!

ChattiFX:

Same thing has happened to me… trying to open a trade manually it says that trading is disabled…

Duk74:

Alpari have closed my short Eur/Usd trade and are not answering the phone!!!!

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