Posts tagged 'Equities'

The Relentless Josh Brown

We’re fans of The Reformed Broker. Reluctantly, sometimes. But fans nevertheless.

So we should just note that a Josh Brown post from Wednesday, looking at the relentless growth of passive asset management and its effect on equity markets has, quite simply, gone viral.

In fact, if you are a market professional and it’s not in your inbox already this morning, you are a failure.

To save your blushes, here’s the link to the original, here’s Josh’s follow up, and here are some choice quotes to memorise quickly… Read more

Retail has rotated

A new year is a new country, so far as the investment prognostication world is concerned. What will people do with their clean slates, we wonder?

Buy equities is a strong contender. It appears to be what retail investors finally did last year after years of revealing their preference for bonds, and they aren’t done yet. If you don’t believe us, well, we have charts… Read more

Dear Dromeus Capital investor…

One-year total return of the Athens stock index, to the end of October 2013: +50%

One-year return of the Bloomberg Greece Sovereign Bond Index, same period: +134%

One-year net return of Dromeus Capital’s Greek Advantage Fund: +107%

Yep — FT Alphaville hears that the first-year performance of Dromeus Capital’s Greece-focused fund would make it one of 2013′s best-performing, having already made a strong start at the beginning of the year.

It’s another indicator of how much both Greek equities, and the sovereign’s restructured debt, have recovered this year… Read more

Sticky Fingerprints (updated)

*CISION: RECEIVED FINGERPRINT RELEASE FROM CONTACT AT FINGERPRINT

That would be the release announcing a $650m acquisition of Fingerprint Cards by Samsung, which – regrettably – has turned out to be completely made-up, and possibly a matter for the Swedish authorities. Read more

An elegant solution to a conspiracy problem

OK, hands up. We did not pay attention in March when Canadian securities regulators proposed to tighten rules for when investors must disclose their activities to the rest of the market.

The CSA is still considering, and the Globe and Mail reported on Monday that it’s not just activists who are wary. However, what has belatedly caught our notice are some excellent ideas from ISDA about derivatives disclosure, which could also be relevant south of the border. Read more

Playing profit with the stock market

This is is a guest post from Philip Pilkington, a writer and research assistant at Kingston University.

Gavyn Davies recently had an interesting take on stock prices in the US. Davies made the point that the profit share in the US had risen substantially against the wage share in recent years, and then argued that this rise in the profit share is what currently underpins equity prices. Read more

Tin hat time, illustrated

Time for a rush into Gold? Nope. Read more

Quick, sell now George! (Updated)

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A female director purchases shares in her company: what happens next?

Does the Stock Market Gender Stereotype Corporate Boards? Evidence from the Market’s Reaction to Directors’ Trades.”

Does this title of a recently published study by a group of researchers at the University of Exeter make you think:

A. Hmm, “gender stereotype”. That’s wordy.

B. Oh boy, what’s the media going to do with this one… Read more

S&P 2,100, by Goldman Sachs

Here it is Goldman’s big call: the S&P 500 will reach 1,750 by the end of this year; 1,900 in 2014; and 2,100 in 2015.

H/T Josh Brown, who points out this isn’t about earnings but a re-rating of equities (and dividends). Read more

That equities/commodities disconnect

Yes, we know it’s not new, but the divergence between stock markets and commodity prices is now looking extreme. Consider this chart from Julian Jessop at Capital Economics…

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“Phish and dips,” or, How to write the AP tweet hacking story when you don’t really care

1.) Steal headline from Lorcan. On Twitter.

2.) Multiple choice test to decide your condescending lede!

Question: When a fake (hacked!) Associated Press tweet about a White House attack moves the stock market down, then it recovers really fast — but maybe not making anyone much money — this is a referendum on the credibility of:

a) Twitter

b) Associated Press

c) The stock market

d) How FT Alphaville makes a living

e) All of the above

f) None of the above, shut up and get off Twitter

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So, who was KPMG’s LA guy allegedly leaking to?

Isn’t that the big question here?

Given that this story — about the auditor firing a partner over “providing non-public client information to a third party, who then used that information in stock trades involving several West Coast companies” — has now slammed straight into the Herbalife story. Read more

Productivity, “reindustrialisation” and the US profit share

US industrial production has grown at least twice as fast as GDP since the start of the recovery.

Onshoring” work because wage differentials are narrowing plus falling electricity prices because of shale gas = more growth, so… great! Maybe? Read more

Love is a many splendoured thing…

… but regally proportioned, unemployed gents with untreated gonorrhoea and mother issues generally find it tough going.

Not so with Aim-traded online dating specialist Cupid according to Bronte Capital’s John Hempton who threw up a rather extreme fake profile — Fat, lazy, poor sick guy wants support – to see if he got many bites. Read more

Kaffeeklatsch der Bären

From Albert Edwards’ latest:

I was on gardening leave when the Dow reached its previous peak in October 2007. One echo from those days is that I was beginning to feel lonely. Pessimism (realism) is very rare on the sell-side so I took a coffee with my fellow bear, Bob Janjuah and cheered up tremendously, reinforced in my belief that this is all going to end very, very badly indeed. Read more

The age of infinite equity?

Financial pundits, academics, fund managers and analysts all have an amazing tendency to over-complicate matters.

Sometimes, however, it takes just one person spelling out the obvious to really get to the root of the problem. Read more

Let’s wait for a fall in stocks before declaring a great rotation

With all the excitement about ‘the great rotation’, it often feels that the debate focuses too much on analysing the recent flows, and less about the greed/fear dynamics driving them.

It’s been well documented that bond holders are increasingly frustrated by the miserable yields on offer in the fixed income markets, and are apparently flocking into the ‘cheap’ equity markets. We’ve already voiced our scepticism about the scale of this flocking. Yet what’s potentially also underestimated is the degree of skittishness by bond holders when the stock markets show signs of a wobble. After all, a lot of capital in fixed income got there after investors were burnt in the early 2000s. This loss aversion shouldn’t be underestimated. Read more

The great rotation: Not so great, and not even really a rotation

The ‘great rotation’ from bonds into equities: a few weeks ago it was looking like it might be seriously on. Even Albert Edwards sort of kind of said equities were cheap. And Ray Dalio said it is happening, too.

But there are a bunch of reasons why it doesn’t seem to be quite such a sure thing, at least for now. Read more

A bit of post-Sohn naming and shaming

The 17th annual Sohn conference took place last May in New York and drew a star-studded panel of fund managers to offer (a few of) their best trade ideas.

Everyone was there, from David Einhorn to John Paulson and Bill Ackman. Topics as diverse as palladium, French CDS and Argentina’s sovereign debt were discussed.

But were the trade ideas any good? Read more

Albert and those ‘cheapest for a generation’ equities

Sadly, FT Alphaville’s New York wing couldn’t make it to this year’s Societe Generale-run bear sighting in London — the bank’s Global Strategy conference starring Albert Edwards and Dylan Grice (who’s off to the buyside).

But we did hear that Albert had called European stocks “unambiguously cheap”. It’s a “once in a generation” buying opportunity, and so on. Is Albert, no longer a equities bear!? Read more

On diminishing capital intensity

An interesting debate is popping up regarding the topic of capital expenditure.

Take the latest from Societe Generale’s Andrew Lapthorne and team. They argued on Thursday that the commonly held belief that companies’ capital investing ratios have been falling, whilst hoarded cash pools have been going up, is inaccurate. Read more

The January effect in European equities

WARNING: what has happened is no guarantee of what will happen.

WARNING II: if you need the first WARNING, perhaps see us after class?

Anyway… here’s some January European equity lessons from Morgan Stanley: Read more

Grice moves on

And the Societe Generale strategist (who says he will “resurface on the buy side early next year”) is going out in style — taking a leaf from the book of the order Blattodea.

From Dylan Grice’s last Popular Delusions note:

All good things come to an end, sadly. So it is with my time here alongside Albert, Andy and the rest of the gang at SG. I’m signing off, checking out, moving on to pastures new. It’s been a wonderful time. But after three years of trying to sound clever it’s time for me to do something altogether more difficult, and actually be clever. So early next year, I will join a small but outstanding investment practice. Naturally, I hope it will be a great success. But what makes a great success? Since there are few more accomplished species on earth than the lowly cockroach where better to start looking for an answer?

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The good (political) times are over for risk assets

Risk assets have had a good run from western policymakers for several decades, says Morgan Stanley’s Gerard Minack. But that time is probably over. Read more

Dark clouds of certainty, or something

Well we’re no longer off 300 points on the Dow. (Off 265, as we went to pixels.) But what went on here?

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Rajoyed

Spotted on Tuesday — a market getting itself in a lather as soon as the Spanish prime minister denies that a bailout is ‘inminente’. (Via Google Finance)

Grinding lower and crashing higher

Oops, we missed this from Macro Risk Advisors on Tuesday — the charts track realised volatility being higher on days the S&P 500 has closed up than when it’s fallen, so far this year. Which, they say, is a little unusual.

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Selling love and buying panic

If life seems jolly rotten, there’s something you’ve forgotten
And that’s to laugh and smile and dance and sing [and buy stocks]
When you’re feeling in the dumps, don’t be silly, chumps
Just purse your lips and whistle [and buy stocks], that’s the thing

– By Eric Idle Read more

Shorts in the rally

A couple weeks ago, FT Alphaville asked who’s “buying” the rally in US equities. We also noted that volumes are low not only because its August, but also due to a trend that’s at least a few years old. Now we ask, are the shorts hanging on or is it more a question of piling in?

Andrew Wilkinson of Miller Tabak decided that with major indices hitting multi-year highs, it’s a good time to look into which sectors have the most short interest. Here’s what he found: Read more