Posts tagged 'Bank of England'

An auction addendum…

So, while we were knee-deep in game theory trying to determine the best way to sell gilts, the Bank of England had some trouble buying them.

The BoE’s purchase of long-term government debt fell short of target Tuesday, which is noteworthy for plenty of reasons. One is that it’s yet another sign of that safe-asset shortage. But the thing is, the competitive bids are intermediated by banks and dealers. And that calls attention to a BIS paper from last month, which shows the results aren’t always pretty when economic policy collides with the zero-sum world of trading. Read more

Guest post: What a UK macro-financial framework should look like as Brexit is negotiated

Peter Doyle, a former IMF staffer, advises the UK government not to delay rewriting the fiscal and macro-financial rules for the Brexit era… Read more

Cbank digital currencies and the path to Gosbankification

Central banks issuing their own digital currencies (on blockchains, naturally) is an idea currying ever more favour in high-brow economic and banking circles.

Fedcoin. BoEcoin. ECBcoin. They’re all (allegedly) at it — or at the very least contemplating the idea as a work-around to the zero lower bound and other niggling monetary problems.

This month the BoE issued a paper on the topic entitled “The macroeconomics of central bank issued digital currencies. A related blog “Central bank digital currency: the end of monetary policy as we know it?” was published this week. But if you Google “central bank blockchain” you’ll find a gazillion references or more from all over the world talking about the subject. Read more

On panics past…

The Bank of England has taken to ‘pre-releasing’ quaint articles from its forthcoming Quarterly Bulletin, which sounds like good, modern marketing — until you remind yourself that it’s been released on the day the intended audience are still ploughing their way through the 50 dense pages that make up the twice-a-year Financial Stability Report.

No matter. The QB proper is published on July 12 and in the meantime this is a fascinating little piece of history about the original Black Friday… Read more

What markets think Brexit means for the Bank of England

If you’d asked any observer four or five years ago which country would be the first to leave the European Union, few would have guessed it would be the UK. Of all the countries in the EU, the UK is probably the one with the least to gain from meaningful changes in its economic relationships with its neighbours. Yet here we are.

London’s stock markets, priced in sterling, probably understate the expected impact on the UK economy given the sectoral and geographic earnings mix of the listed companies. So we looked at the short-term interest rate markets to get a sense of how traders think the Bank of England will react to the vote. Read more

BHS has only itself to blame for its pension troubles

Here’s an odd argument the Bank of England is somehow to blame for BHS’s massive pension hole. This is the key bit:

The investment environment fundamentally changed post-2008. To keep the UK economy liquid in the crisis, between August 2008 and March 2009, the Bank of England cut the base interest rate from 5% to a record low of 0.5%, where it has stayed ever since…The problem arises in the difference between the amount of money set aside to cover eventual pensions and the obligations. The entire DB scheme is a bet that today’s investments will always come good, forever, and cover tomorrow’s guaranteed payments.

Schemes had been banking on annual returns from their investments of at least 5%. Suddenly, with low interest rates, and stocks going through the post-crisis trough, it’s down to 0.5% as a base. That means they have to put up a lot more new money to get the returns they need.

Contrary to what’s implied in the piece, it’s quite simple to manage a defined-benefit pension properly — especially if most of the beneficiaries are already retired. The level of interest rates only matters if you’re doing it wrong. Read more

Those ring-fencing proposals in full

Here are the two consultation papers on ring-fencing British retail banks from their investment banking counterparts. But in case you are wondering whether there’s a fresh joined-up-ness to financial regulation in the UK, see below a statement from the FCA… Read more

Why the outrage over Carney’s climate speech?

This guest post is from Kate Mackenzie, a former Alphavillian who now works with The Climate Institute in Australia.

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Anytime a public figure mentions climate change, you can guarantee a fierce response — and, sure enough, it happened again with Mark Carney’s speech on climate risk. Read more

Beyond corporate finance 101

Fascinating discussion here from the Bank of England’s Andy Haldane on the stresses and strains facing shareholder-controlled corporate entities pretty much everywhere.

A quick taste:

These criticisms have deep micro-economic roots and thick macro-economic branches. Some incremental change is occurring to trim these branches. But it may be time for a more fundamental re-rooting of company law if we are to tackle these problems at source. The stakes – for companies, the economy and wider society – could scarcely be higher.

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The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street blogs!

Welcome to Bank Underground, the official (and slightly subversive sounding?) Bank of England staff blog.

It’s gone live this Friday, with not one but two inaugural posts touching on topics as far ranging as the impact of driverless cars on the insurance industry to the somewhat wonkish debate over how the ELB (effective lower bound) might one day constrain monetary policy and inflation.

While the BoE isn’t the first central bank to publish staff analysis in blog form– the New York Fed’s staff have been blogging on Liberty Street Economics since 2012 — it is the first that intends to use the medium as a mechanism for self-scrutiny and internal challenge.

As Andy Haldane, the Bank’s chief economist and executive director of monetary analysis and statistics told FT Alphaville this fits with the Bank’s push to make itself more open and transparent. Read more

The Bank of England’s balance sheet in looong-term perspective

In celebration of the Bank of England’s One Bank Research conference, the Bank has, for the first time, produced information on its balance sheet going back more than three centuries “in a user-friendly spreadsheet form and as continuous time series.”

There’s lots to digest in there, but one thing we’d like to focus on is the size of the balance sheet relative to the UK economy. Bond-buying initiated under the Bank’s quantitative easing programme boosted the relative size of the Old Lady’s holdings by a large amount relative to the recent past. Relative to the full history, however, QE looks somewhat less exceptional: Read more

The BoE on fundamental digital change in central banking

Here’s a comment to note in the Bank of England’s “fundamental change” section of its One Bank Research Agenda discussion paper:

Technology is potentially transforming the landscape for money and banking. New digital or e-monies and new methods of payment and financial intermediation raise fundamental questions for financial regulation, money demand generally and central bank money in particular. For example, might central banks issue digital currencies and what would be the impact on existing payment and settlement systems? Is the cryptographic technology behind Bitcoin transformational? How will financial regulation need to adapt if new non-bank credit intermediaries emerge in scale?

Talk of official digital money, of course, is not new to FT Alphaville readers. Nor, for that matter is talk of collaborative non-bank credit unions that mint their own currencies for their own network use. Or even talk of digital money solutions that open up the central bank’s balance sheet to more people in a way that eases the safe-asset shortage. Read more

The Bank of England is responding to change

The Bank of England, in case you thought otherwise, is a thoroughly modern institution that embraces change, innovation and the hip lexicon of the fintech start-up of today.

That’s why on Wednesday, in a bid to show us just how ‘with it’ the Old Lady Threadneedle Street really is, the Bank will be launching its “One Bank Research Agenda”, focused on crowd-sourcing feedback on all its policies, structures and methodologies. Read more

BoE wonks on a limited QE hunt

We know instinctively that the Bank of England doesn’t like to be seen to be inflating stock market bubbles. That money printed for the purposes of quantitative easing might be flowing into the hands of existing equity holders (such as corporate executive management) would reinforce the wholly disagreeable notion that Britain’s central bank was actually fuelling the growth in wealth inequality.

So we should not be surprised when two Bank economists, Michael Joyce and Zhuoshi Liu, together with a colleague from Bath University, Ian Tonks, publish a piece of research stating… Read more

Transparency for me (MPC), but not for thee (FPC)

Did you know there’s something called the Eijffinger-Geraats central bank transparency index?

There is one. It’s in the Warsh Review. On Thursday, the Bank of England accepted the review’s recommendations in favour of more open central banking. So, it decided to release minutes of meetings alongside policy decisions as they come out, to release transcripts of those meetings eight years later — and to hold fewer meetings a year from 2016 (8 versus 12). Read more

What would BoE rate hikes do to UK households?

The Bank of England’s latest quarterly bulletin, released on Monday, contains an interesting article on “the potential impact of higher interest rates on the household sector.”

A few interesting tidbits:

–Raising rates by 2 percentage points would redistribute income “from higher-income to lower-income households”

–But would probably lead to a reduction in spending, since 60 per cent of borrowers would spend less and only 10 per cent of savers would spend more. The BoE estimates that the net effect of a 1 percentage point increase in the Bank Rate would be a reduction “aggregate spending by around 0.5 per cent via a redistribution of income from borrowers to savers.” A 2 percentage point increase would lower spending by 1 per cent. (The total impact on spending could be a bit different, however, since monetary policy works in other ways besides redistributing income from net savers to net borrowers.)

–On the whole, though, UK households are (slightly) less sensitive to increases in interest rates than they were a few years ago Read more

MoneySupply: Why the BoE is talking nonsense

Nonsense is a rude word. But there isn’t a milder way of describing the Bank of England’s estimates of UK labour market slack.

For three inflation reports in a row, the BoE has published a chart (below) showing its model of labour market slack with accompanying text highlighting its great importance in the monetary policy decision. “One of the key determinants of inflationary pressures in the economy is spare capacity or slack – that is the balance between demand and supply,” the November inflation report states. Read more

‘The Age of Asset Management’ — less risk, not more

This guest post, from Brian Reid, chief economist of the Investment Company Institute, is a response to this speech in April by the Bank of England’s chief economist, Andrew Haldane…

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As banks learn to live under tighter post-crisis constraints, central bankers around the world are worrying about financial risks that could move from banks to capital markets and perhaps trigger the next great crisis. After the experience of 2007–08, regulators rightly should be on guard for sources of weakness in the financial system.

Unfortunately, in their vigour, many regulators are seeing ‘systemic risk’—threats to the stability of the financial system—when the issue at hand is investment risk. Investment risk is a necessary part of a well-functioning economy, attracting investors willing to take known risks in hopes of gaining a reward. Systemic risk occurs when the financial system itself breaks down and is unable to perform its normal functions of matching savings to investment opportunities or facilitating economic activity. Read more

Let the generational war begin

(Disclosure: the author is 27… and renting.)

From the UK Prudential Regulation Authority’s consultation paper on the loan-to-income cap… Read more

London gets a monetary policy

The PRA and the FCA should ensure that mortgage lenders do not extend more than 15% of their total number of new residential mortgages at loan to income ratios at or greater than 4.5. This recommendation applies to all lenders which extend residential mortgage lending in excess of £100 million per annum. The recommendation should be implemented as soon as is practicable.

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The Still Failing Funding for Lending Scheme

We continue to be utterly bemused by this Bank of England support facility. Here’s net lending to UK businesses and “non-bank credit providers” by FLS extension participants in Q1…

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Macro-pru versus UK housing

First take a trip down Gavyn Davies way where he’ll explain that macro prudential controls are nothing new, that they’re making a comeback post-Greenspan and that they are aimed at stabilising the financial cycle rather than the economic cycle (not always mutually exclusive, of course):

The case for macro prudential controls is straightforward. During economic upswings, the behaviour of the financial system can become destabilising. Banks’ balance sheets are flattered by the expanding economy and low interest rates, so credit supply expands aggressively. This fuels the boom until risk taking becomes excessive, and even a moderate rise in interest rates produces a financial crash.Direct intervention in the financial system to head off these problems early, through increased capital and liquidity standards, seems to be justified.

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Carney’s gone all MLK on us

Click to read One Mission. One Bank. Promoting the good of the people of the United Kingdom.

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No pressure or anything

In her role as Deputy Governor for Markets and Banking, Dr Shafik will be responsible for reshaping the Bank’s operations and balance sheet, including ensuring robust risk management practices and helping to lead the design and execution of an eventual exit from quantitative easing by the MPC. She will also oversee the implementation of reforms to the Bank’s Sterling Monetary Framework, lead the Bank’s work to build fair, efficient and effective financial markets, and review and strengthen the Bank’s Markets and Banking areas, including a comprehensive review of the Bank’s essential market intelligence function.

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Guest post: Back to the future with Scottish currency

The following is a guest post from Chris Cook, a senior research fellow at the Institute for Security and Resilience Studies at University College London. His work is focused on a new generation of networked markets – which will, in Chris’s view, necessarily be dis-intermediated, open, decentralised and, therefore, resilient. But his approach is informed by the past, and it is there that he finds a framework for an independent Scotland to use the pound, a Plan A Plus.

The rejection by all the Westminster parties collectively of the SNP’s Plan A for a post-independence UK currency union has elicited a string of possible Plan B solutions, several of them already considered and rejected as inferior to Plan A by the SNP’s expert group of ‘wise men’.

But the current debate is ill-founded, since the UK can have no more control over who uses the £ symbol as a unit of account, than they can have control over the use of metres and kilogrammes. Read more

Inflation, reported [Update]

So just how fast will the the Bank of England raise interest rates? For clues and pointers on its latest thinking now that employment has rapidly approached the thresholds (markers, thumb rules?) of forward guidance , the Inflation Report is out. Click to get straight to it:

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Slackers?

Inflation had returned to the 2% target… and cost pressures were subdued. Members therefore saw no immediate need to raise Bank Rate even if the 7% unemployment threshold were to be reached in the near future. Moreover, it was likely that the headwinds to growth associated with the aftermath of the financial crisis would persist for some time yet and that inflationary pressures would remain contained…

Someone tell cable? Read more

Sterling to Carney…

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UK consumer is fine, small business health next

Declaring victory by press release on Thursday, the Bank of England announced that it will re-focus its funding for lending scheme towards small businesses next year.

The current scheme expires at the end of January, and a day after the ECB floated its own funding-for-lending trial balloon, the UK central bank has said that it will carry on, but “with incentives in the scheme skewed heavily towards lending to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).”

Major thanks also to the housing market boom (our emphasis): Read more

UK bank leverage ratios, mind-meld du jour

Dear Mark,

I would also wish to understand the impact of the introduction of the leverage ratio on the ability of the banks to support growth in lending to UK consumers and businesses…

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